LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Photography: Technology and Traditions"
Oct
24
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Photography: Technology and Traditions"

Art Right Now - Photography: Technology and Traditions
Paula Burleigh, teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

The digital age has redefined the field of photography, a medium that is unique for its overlap with the non-art world. Indeed, we live in and for pictures. Owing to the advent of Photoshop and other means of digital editing, the appearance of photographic imagery is no longer constrained by the fact-based physical world. Photography today occupies a strange and sometimes uneasy position between acting as document/witness, and a fabricated image. We will look at how artists working in photography negotiate this tension, how photographic methods have changed along with technology, how photography has changed post-internet, and finally, how artists continue to experiment with now antiquated methods of film-based photography.  Artists featured will include Rodney Graham, An-My Lê, Catherine Opie, Josephine Pryde and Lisa Oppenheim, among others.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY INTERNATIONAL TRIP: Vienna: Treasures of an Imperial Capital and Birthplace of Modern Design
Oct
29
to Nov 5

MEMBERS-ONLY INTERNATIONAL TRIP: Vienna: Treasures of an Imperial Capital and Birthplace of Modern Design

Vienna: Treasures of an Imperial Capital and Birthplace of Modern Design

 This exclusive art journey, organized by Gayle Tilles of Connoisseur Arts and led by engaging European art experts Dr. Ulrich Leben and Chris Boïcos joined by Viennese curators and experts, will showcase magnificent treasures of this former imperial capital throughout the centuries to the present day.

Participants will discover breathtaking imperial treasures, the finest collections of master paintings and drawings, and magnificient architecture and sculpture, while enjoying classic Viennese restaurants and coffee houses, private receptions and dinners--promising to be an unforgettable art journey of a lifetime.

Members-only; please see full description for details and RSVP via the Vienna Trip Registration Form.  Contact ASG Office for more information.

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LECTURE: Rena M. Hoisington, "Black, White & Abstract: Callahan, Siskind, White"
Oct
31
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Rena M. Hoisington, "Black, White & Abstract: Callahan, Siskind, White"

Black, White & Abstract: Callahan, Siskind, White**
Rena M. Hoisington, Senior Curator and Department Head, Department of Prints, Drawings & Photographs, The Baltimore Museum of Art

Exhibition curator Rena Hosington will discuss the BMA’s exhibit Black, White and Abstract (on view at the BMA through October 1, 2017) which considers the work of three of the most important and influential American photographers of the 20th century: Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, and Minor White.

The BMA is fortunate to have strong holdings of works by Callahan and Siskind, and now White as well thanks to the recent acquisition of the nine-part series Sound of One Hand Clapping, Sequence 14, never before on view at the Museum. Born within a decade of one another, Callahan, Siskind, and White each took up photography in the 1930s, with their work coming to the fore in the 1940s and 1950s as they embarked on long teaching careers. Although they worked primarily in black and white they periodically experimented with color photography, especially Callahan. Each, in his own way, was interested in pursuing abstraction, though their work was always tied to representational subject matter. All three photographers were also intrigued by exploring formal and/or conceptual themes through series of photographs.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers
** on view at the BMA through October 1, 2017

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Michael Ambrose, "Scale: Contemporary Issues of Conceptualization and Realization in Architecture"
Nov
7
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Michael Ambrose, "Scale: Contemporary Issues of Conceptualization and Realization in Architecture"

Scale: Contemporary Issues of Conceptualization and Realization in Architecture
Michael Ambrose, Associate Clinical Professor and Associate Director of the Architecture Program, University of Maryland

Professor Ambrose returns to Art Seminar Group for a discussion of issues of scale from both the conceptualization of design ideas in the “how” of architectural design and practice and the “what” of architectural production in the realization of contemporary buildings and building cultures. Architects at the New York design and design-build firm SHoP say “make buildings conceptual and make concepts buildable”. This new adage begins to engage the multifaceted issue of scale in contemporary architectural discourse. Fundamental shifts in the means and methods of architectural thought and production are changing the ways architects conceive of and design architecture. This is leading to interesting new relationships and interrogations of scale in architecture today.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture
Nov
13
9:15am 9:15am

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

DC Day Trip: Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

ASG returns to NMAAHC! The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. There are four pillars upon which the NMAAHC stands: It provides an opportunity for those who are interested in African American culture to explore and revel in this history through interactive exhibitions. It helps all Americans see how their stories, their histories, and their cultures are shaped and informed by global influences. It explores what it means to be an American and share how American values like resiliency, optimism, and spirituality are reflected in African American history and culture. It serves as a place of collaboration that reaches beyond Washington, D.C. to engage new audiences and to work with the myriad of museums and educational institutions that have explored and preserved this important history well before this museum was created.

Members-only; please see full description for details and RSVP via the Reply Form. 

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Sarah Gordon, "Refiguring Muybridge: The Animal Locomotion Nudes Then and Now"
Nov
14
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Sarah Gordon, "Refiguring Muybridge: The Animal Locomotion Nudes Then and Now"

Refiguring Muybridge: The Animal Locomotion Nudes Then and Now
Sarah Gordon, lecturer, curator & art consultant, Washington, DC

Eadweard Muybridge has long been known as the “Father of the Motion Picture” for his 1870s serial fast action photographs of horses galloping, the predecessor to the film strip. The male and female nudes he photographed as part of the Animal Locomotion project in the 1880s are equally as groundbreaking but far less studied. This talk will discuss the Animal Locomotion nudes’ pivotal position in Muybridge’s motion studies and their role in major intellectual advances of the Victorian era, including the development of modern art, advances in science and medicine, and the emergence of evolutionary theory. We will then look closely at contemporary responses to the Animal Locomotion nudes. While 1960s conceptual artists tended to incorporate the seriality and gridded nature of Muybridge’s pictures into their work, other recent painters and lens-based artists have investigated issues of gender, power, and pleasure, which are equally prominent in the Muybridge nudes. Through this investigation, we will begin to understand Muybridge not only as the father of film, but also as the instigator of a very particular mode of viewing the human body.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Matthew Bachman, "Steinway & Sons: A Cultural Force for Innovation and Excellence"
Dec
5
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Matthew Bachman, "Steinway & Sons: A Cultural Force for Innovation and Excellence"

Steinway & Sons: A Cultural Force for Innovation and Excellence
Dr. Matthew Bachman, Director of Institutional Advancement and Operations, Steinway Piano of Baltimore/Washington, DC


Since 1853, Steinway & Sons has been at the forefront of American culture. Founded to build the best piano possible, Steinway has been producing pianos with a unique blend of old world craftsmanship and cutting edge technology since its inception. Having survived numerous economic downturns and national crises (including, but not limited to, warding off rioters threatening to burn their New York factory during the Civil War), Steinway has the distinction of being one of the oldest continuously operating American businesses. From the beginning, Steinway has been committed to bringing the world’s finest musical talent to the Americas, beginning with Anton Rubinstein in the 19th century, Ignaz Paderewski and Vladimir Horowitz in the 20th, and Lang Lang and Yuja Wang in the 21st. This presentation will outline the history and impact of Steinway & Sons on American culture from its inception through the present, share secrets of the construction of the legendary Steinway grand piano (with visuals and an actual Steinway grand), and provide a glimpse to what the future of Steinway holds.  This presentation will include surprise guest performers!

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Evan Drachman, "Chopin’s Other Favorite Instrument: An Exploration of Chopin’s Music for the ‘Cello"
Dec
12
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Evan Drachman, "Chopin’s Other Favorite Instrument: An Exploration of Chopin’s Music for the ‘Cello"

Chopin’s Other Favorite Instrument: An Exploration of Chopin’s Music for the ‘Cello
Evan Drachman, cellist and Artistic Director for The Piatigorsky Foundation

Frederic Chopin was one of the greatest pianists of all time. In addition to performing, he composed a large body of works primarily for his own instrument. These works have stood the test of time and have been beloved by musicians and audiences since their conception.  Chopin’s music possesses a quality of both lyricism and technical virtuosity. The technical challenges in this music changed the scope of the piano’s capabilities. Interestingly, Chopin wrote for only one other instrument. He composed three works for ‘cello and piano as well as a trio for piano, violin and ‘cello. Drachman will discuss Chopin’s music for the cello as well as perform his great Sonata Op. 65 in G minor with pianist Richard Dowling. 

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Sarah Greenough, "Photography Reinvented: The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection"
Dec
19
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Sarah Greenough, "Photography Reinvented: The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection"

Photography Reinvented: The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection
Sarah Greenough, Senior Curator and Head of the Department of Photographs, National Gallery of Art

Sarah Greenough, the founding curator of the department of photographs at the National Gallery of Art, will discuss Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker’s collection of contemporary photography. Acquired between 2007 and 2016, their collection includes groundbreaking pictures by many of the most celebrated photographers of our time, such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, Candida Hofer, Cindy Sherman, and Hiroshi Sugimoto, among others. Ms. Greenough will speak about the evolution of the Meyerhoff-Becker collection and note how these photographers - through their innovative experimentation and visionary conceptual scope - have changed the course of contemporary photography.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Ethnography and Place in Contemporary Art"
Oct
17
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Ethnography and Place in Contemporary Art"

Art Right Now - Ethnography and Place in Contemporary Art
Paula Burleigh, teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

In 1996, the art historian Hal Foster published “The Artist as Ethnographer,” arguing that art had experienced an “ethnographic turn” whereby artists routinely adapted language and methods from anthropology to make representations of cultures and communities (usually not their own). Drawing upon recent trends in film, video, and performance-based work, this lecture reconsiders Foster’s ideas in relation to the contemporary art world, highlighting artists who engage themes of cultural representation, place-based identity, and cultural history in their practice. We will look at how artists try to negotiate the politics of representing communities and people, with the dangers of appropriation and fetishization. We will consider examples of artworks that challenge conventions of the travel narrative, the documentary film, and the interview, in order to move toward a model of art making that accords agency to both the artist-creator and the represented subject. Artists to be discussed include Paul Chan, Maya Stovall, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Sky Hopinka, and Tuan Andrew Nguyen, among others.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Russell Sale, "Protecting Fertility in Fra Filippo Lippi’s ‘Portrait of a Woman with a Man at a Casement' in the MET"
Oct
10
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Russell Sale, "Protecting Fertility in Fra Filippo Lippi’s ‘Portrait of a Woman with a Man at a Casement' in the MET"

Protecting Fertility in Fra Filippo Lippi’s ‘Portrait of a Woman with a Man at a Casement' in the Metropolitan Museum of Art
J. Russell Sale, Ph.D., Research Associate in Renaissance and Baroque Art, The Walters Art Museum

In this lecture, Dr. Sale will expand our understanding of Fra Filippo Lippi’s ‘Portrait of a Woman with a Man at a Casement’, a fascinating but problematic Renaissance portrait. He will report on his investigation of the male figure’s significant gesture, its multiple meanings over time, and how its use by Lippi expands our understanding of the portrait.

The figure’s hands present the ancient mano cornuta, or horned-hand gesture, with the index and little fingers extended and the middle and ring fingers bent down. With a legacy of erotic and phallic associations in Greek and Roman art, the gesture had a variety of associations. A major one was as an apotropaic motif for warding off the Evil Eye - the harm that was believed to be caused by an envious gaze - a Mediterranean-wide folk belief that has persisted to modern times. The gesture’s perceived potency for protection and promoting well-being also led to its adaptation as a Christian Blessing. Displayed conspicuously to ward off danger in the portrait, the gesture protects the family lineage signified by the heraldic arms on which it rests, as well as the fecundity of the young woman who is the prime interest of the man and his action. The male and his gesture also bring a message of anticipated fertility through the meeting of masculine and feminine life forces.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Chihuly at NYBG and The Bronx Museum of The Arts    
Oct
5
6:30am 6:30am

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Chihuly at NYBG and The Bronx Museum of The Arts    

Day trip to New York: Tours of Chihuly at The New York Botanical Garden and The AIM Biennial at The Bronx Museum of The Arts                  

The New York Botanical Garden, founded in 1891, is a National Historic Landmark and one of the greatest botanical gardens in the world.  An iconic living museum, it is distinguished by the beauty of its diverse landscape and extensive collections and gardens.  A special exhibit of artworks by the world renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly is now on view. ASG members will have a guided tour of some of the artist’s 20 works that dazzle the eye with color, light and form. 

After lunch, ASG will head to the Bronx Museum of the Arts, an internationally recognized cultural destination presenting innovative contemporary art exhibitions, founded in 1972.  It moved into its award-winning building on the Grand Concourse, designed by Arquitectonica, in 2006. We will be guided through several exhibits including Bronx Calling: The Fourth AIM Biennial, Heidi Lau: The Primordial Molder and Ivan Velez: Bronx Haiku. Bronx Calling features the work of seventy-two emerging artists from the 2016 and 2017 classes of the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program. AIM provides professional development resources to emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. More information: http://www.bronxmuseum.org/exhibitions/

 Members-only; please see full description for details and RSVP via the Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Contemporary Painting Returns, Part II"
Oct
3
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Contemporary Painting Returns, Part II"

Art Right Now - Contemporary Painting Returns, Part II
Paula Burleigh, teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art  

In this second lecture on contemporary painting now, Paula Burleigh continues her examination of the re-emergence of painting as a medium, along with its traditional genres, among today’s artists.  This talk will include a look at works on paper.   

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Contemporary Painting Returns, Part I"
Sep
26
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art Right Now - Contemporary Painting Returns, Part I"

Art Right Now - Contemporary Painting Returns, Part I
Paula Burleigh, teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

Suffering more deaths and revivals than any other medium, painting was declared regressive and moribund throughout the second half of the 20th century, only to make perennial returns from the grave. Arguably we are in the midst of one such return: after the wane of painting’s popularity in the 1990s, the 21st century has ushered in a renewal of the medium as well as traditional genres including history painting, portraiture and still life. These two lectures explore these and other themes discernible in contemporary painting, including sensuality and the body, abstraction, the politics of representation, and folk art aesthetics. We will look at examples of painting (and in the second part, works on paper as well) by both established and emerging artists working today, including Kerry James Marshall, Amy Sillman, Terry Winters, Nicole Eisenman, Tschabalala Self, Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Tala Madani, among others.

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LECTURE: Brian Allen, "What’s American About American Art?"
Sep
19
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Brian Allen, "What’s American About American Art?"

What’s American About American Art?
Brian Allen, independent curator and scholar

“What’s American about American Art?” plots the continuum of American Art from the 18th century to today through a focused investigation of seven paintings from the National Gallery of Art. The artists selected to represent American Art over the course of the last 250 years are John Singleton Copley, Thomas Cole, Winslow Homer, George Bellows, Jackson Pollock, Roy Lichtenstein and Glen Ligon. Many factors contribute to the creation of distinctly American painting: a focus on tangibles, empirical facts, objective visual representation, and a drive to capture no more than the essentials comes from American practicality and a Puritan belief that God created all earthly things to serve a purpose and a sense of God having blessed America with limitless abundance. It's not coincidental that so many American artists also worked in advertising and for newspapers. American interest in new products and technologies, popular forms of entertainment and everyday life became the subject of American Art in the modern era, reflecting the unique civic identity of an ever-changing vast country leavened by new people and cultures.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Erica Battle, "Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studies"
Sep
12
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Erica Battle, "Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studies"

Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studies
Erica F. Battle, The John Alchin and Hal Marryatt Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia Museum of Art

This talk will examine Bruce Nauman’s latest works, concentrating on the momentous and monumental seven-projection video and sound installation Contrapposto Studies, I through VII(2015/2016), which recently premiered at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Repeating and fragmenting images of the artist walking in the manner of contrapposto - Italian for “counterpose”—this momentous work both revisits an earlier video work, Walk with Contrappostoof 1968, and innovates new conceptual, compositional, and technological territory within the artist’s practice. Taking into consideration the relationship between this installation with Nauman’s early experiments in film, video, and sculpture of the mid-to-late 1960s, the lecture will trace the lineage of the artist’s use of proportional ideals, art historical motifs, and elements of sound that inform his oeuvre in which his body is constantly at work. It will also broaden the usual field of reference within the art historian’s analysis of Nauman’s career to delve into earlier connections within the history of art—including Renaissance-era representations and Greek Classical sculpture—that his late works wryly and incisively invoke. This lecture prefigures the upcoming publication Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studiesco-edited by Erica F. Battle and Carlo Basualdo, to be published by the Philadelphia Museum of Art in association with Yale University Press in Winter 2018.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Contemporary American Theater Festival
Jul
26
9:45am 9:45am

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Contemporary American Theater Festival

Contemporary American Theater Festival
Shepherdstown, West Virginia
9:45 a.m., depart Suburban Club

An “essential summer festival” per the New York Times, CATF is an annual festival of new plays by American playwrights. “CATF specializes in theater about contemporary issues that challenge and entertain. The festival seeks plays that “are designed to provoke, instigate, disturb, and ultimately entertain...new works that come from a place of passion and conviction about society’s hopes and fears...plays that probe the complexities of our world.” -- Ed Herendeen, Founder & Artistic Director

Art Seminar Group will be attending three plays at CATF this year: Niceties, We Will Not Be Silent and Wild Horses. Boxed dinner will be included for all members during our post-performance discussion with Ed Herendeen.

Tickets are still available. Please see Members page to download a copy of the full description and Reply Form. 

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SUMMER FILM SERIES IV: "North by Northwest" - Hitchcock
Jul
20
1:30pm 1:30pm

SUMMER FILM SERIES IV: "North by Northwest" - Hitchcock

North by Northwest (1959)
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint, James Mason, Leo G. Carroll, Martin Landau. When a nondescript ad exec is mistaken for an international spy, he’s forced to hone his survival instincts—and his sense of self—fast. This bracing cross-country thriller inspired the James Bond franchise and was Hitchcock’s finest variation on the theme of mistaken identity, featuring perhaps the most famous chase sequence in film history (“that’s funny . . . that plane’s dustin’ crops where there ain’t no crops”). It was also the director’s final collaboration with Grant, who, in his role as the feckless ad man discovering inner resources and emotions he never thought he had, cemented his status as a Hollywood icon—and one of its most accomplished actors. (136 min, Color)

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Documenta and Berlin
Jul
16
to Jul 23

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Documenta and Berlin

International Trip: Cutting Edge Contemporary Germany
Sculpture Projects Munster, Documenta 14 and Berlin

Art Seminar Group has a very special opportunity to experience the rare convergence of two extraordinary contemporary art fairs in Germany: Sculpture Projects Munster and Documenta 14. We are delighted to be able to offer this once-in-a- lifetime specially designed tour that features both fairs plus several days in Germany’s vibrant capital city of Berlin.

Description and Reply Form previously distributed. Please contact office@artseminargroup.org for more information.

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SUMMER FILM SERIES IV: "Vertigo" - Hitchcock
Jul
13
1:30pm 1:30pm

SUMMER FILM SERIES IV: "Vertigo" - Hitchcock

Vertigo (1958)
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair of Film & Moving Image, Stevenson University

Hitchcock's penultimate film of the 1950s, and his fourth and final with James Stewart, Vertigo replaced Orson Welles' Citizen Kane as the best film of all time in a 2016 British Film Institute poll. Featuring a powerfully neurotic Stewart, the movie highlights the lush cinematography of longtime Hitchcock collaborator Robert Burks as well as the stirringly evocative score by Bernard Herrmann. Kim Novak co-stars as the hapless object of Stewart's desire, whom he meets when he is tasked, as a private detective, to follow the wife of an old friend. She is that wife, and soon he becomes a man possessed, forgetting all sense of professional ethics. Struck with a debilitating vertigo every time he climbs to even the smallest height, Stewart is unable to follow Novak when she runs, in a fit of depression, up the bell tower of the Mission San Juan Bautista. The ensuing tragedy plunges Stewart into madness, which is when the story really begins. This is the movie in which Hitchcock and Burks invented the dolly-zoom shot – now called the "Vertigo shot" – used as a visualization of momentary psychosis and seen in subsequent films such as Jaws and Goodfellas. See it for that, and for Stewart, who gives one of the most moving and disturbing performances of his long career. (128min, Color)

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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SUMMER FILM SERIES II: "Rear Window" - Hitchcock
Jul
11
1:30pm 1:30pm

SUMMER FILM SERIES II: "Rear Window" - Hitchcock

Rear Window (1954)
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Starring James Stewart, Grace Kelly, Thelma Ritter, Raymond Burr, Wendell Corey. A wheelchair-bound photographer entertains himself by spying on his neighbors across the courtyard and subsequently believes he’s uncovered a murder. Hitchcock deemed this his most “purely cinematic film,” and indeed, few movies can match its masterful, highly entertaining exploration of the nature of cinema. But observe the delicious exchanges between Grace Kelly and Jimmy Stewart and it’s clear that Rear Window is just as notable for its brutally clear-eyed dissection of the war between the sexes. This was, after 1948’s Rope, Stewart’s second collaboration with Hitchcock, and Stewart’s obsessive voyeur further explored the darker ambiguities of the actor’s post-World War II persona, the flipside of his pre-war identity as the quintessential boy-next-door. (112min, Color)

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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SUMMER FILM SERIES I: "Notorious" - Hitchcock
Jun
29
1:30pm 1:30pm

SUMMER FILM SERIES I: "Notorious" - Hitchcock

Notorious (1946)
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair of Film & Moving Image, Stevenson University

Hitchcock's eighth Hollywood feature, and his second with Cary Grant (after Suspicion, in 1941), Notorious is not only a taut post-war noir-ish espionage thriller; it is also one of the master's most romantic films. Co-starring Ingrid Bergman as the daughter of a German spy, the movie casts Cary Grant as a debonair American agent who is appointed as Bergman's handler to help capture a ring of escaped Nazis in Brazil. Though he falls hard for her – and she for him – he is forced to facilitate her liaison with the unctuous Claude Rains, the head of the Nazi ring. Grant seethes with barely controlled jealousy as both he and Bergman work desperately against the clock to find the evidence that will put these evil men out of commission. Shot in glorious black & white, the film showcases Hitchcock's growing command of camera and mise-en- scène, including one memorable sequence that leads us, in a single take, from the top of a balustrade to a close-up on a key in Bergman's hand. Along with the other Grant movie in this program, North by Northwest, Notorious demonstrates what a perfect and poised James Bond Cary Grant would have made, had the stars so aligned. (101min, B&W)

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: David Gariff, "Materials and Techniques in Western Painting"
Jun
27
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: David Gariff, "Materials and Techniques in Western Painting"

Materials and Techniques in Western Painting
David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art

All works of art possess a physical and material nature. One of the challenges any artist faces is in matching his or her aesthetic goals with the appropriate materials and processes. Mastery of technique and an understanding of the often complicated nature of these materials and processes is, therefore, a prerequisite for success. This lecture presents a brief discussion and overview of some of the major painting media and techniques in western art history including encaustic, tempera, fresco, oil, and acrylic.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: J. Wynn Rousuck, "Fairy Tales on Broadway"
Jun
13
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: J. Wynn Rousuck, "Fairy Tales on Broadway"

Fairy Tales on Broadway – Not Just for Kids: From the Glass Slipper to the Ruby Slipper
J. Wynn Rousuck, former Baltimore Sun theater critic and current theater critic, WYPR

All fairy tales start “once upon a time,” and for a long time now, fairy tales have provided solid foundations for Broadway musicals. What is it about age-old tales like “Beauty and the Beast” and more modern ones like “The Wizard of Oz” that translate so fluidly to the musical theater stage? In some cases, a single tale has spawned multiple musicals, including runaway hits and Tony Award winners like "Wicked" and "The Wiz." Theater critic Judy Rousuck returns to share her insights on why the stories we read as children have evolved into some of Broadway’s most sophisticated and successful happily-ever-afters.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Joseph Cassar, "The Blue Rider Group, Munich 1911 - 1914"
Jun
6
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Joseph Cassar, "The Blue Rider Group, Munich 1911 - 1914"

The Blue Rider Group, Munich 1911-1914
Joseph Cassar, professor of art, University of Maryland University College and the New York Times Knowledge Network

The Blue Rider Group was founded by a number of Russian emigrants, including Wassily Kandinsky, Alexej von Jawlensky, and native German artists, such as Franz Marc, August Macke and Gabriele Münter. The Der Blaue Reiter movement lasted from 1911 to 1914, and along with Die Brücke which was founded in 1905, was fundamental to Expressionism. The name of the movement is the title of a painting that Kandinsky created in 1903. Kandinsky wrote 20 years later that the name is derived from Marc's enthusiasm for horses and Kandinsky's love of riders, combined with a shared love of the color blue. The artists also shared a desire to express spiritual truths through their art. They believed in the promotion of modern art; the connection between visual art and music; the spiritual and symbolic associations of color; and a spontaneous, intuitive approach to painting. As a result of their encounters with cubist, fauvist and Rayonist ideas, they moved towards abstraction. Der Blaue Reiter organized exhibitions in 1911 and 1912, touring Germany. The group was disrupted by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914. Marc and Macke were killed in combat. Kandinsky, von Werefkin and von Jawlensky were forced to move back to Russia because of their Russian citizenship. Consequently, Der Blaue Reiter was short-lived, lasting for only three years from 1911 to 1914.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Whitney Biennial and High Line
May
25
6:30am 6:30am

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Whitney Biennial and High Line

NYC Day Trip: Whitney 2017 Biennial and High Line Tour
6:30 a.m. depart from Suburban Club, 6:45am depart Cromwell Bridge

The Whitney Biennial is the longest running survey of contemporary art in the United States, with a history of exhibiting the most promising and influential artists and provoking lively debate. The 2017 Biennial is the Museum’s 78th in a continuous series of Annual and Biennial exhibitions initiated by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney in 1932. It is the first to be held in the Whitney’s downtown home at 99 Gansevoort Street, and the largest ever in terms of gallery space. The 2017 Whitney Biennial is co-curated by Christopher Y. Lew and Mia Locks. The exhibition includes 63 participants, ranging from emerging to well-established individuals and collectives working in painting, sculpture, drawing, installation, film and video, photography, activism, performance, music, and video game design.

The High Line design is a collaboration between James Corner Field Operations (Project Lead), Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Piet Oudolf. Converting each section of the High Line from an out-of-use railroad trestle to a public landscape entailed not only years of planning, community input, and work by some of the city's most inventive designers, but also more than two years of construction per section. The High Line's planting design is inspired by the self-seeded landscape that grew on the out-of-use elevated rail tracks during the 25 years after trains stopped running. Rotating exhibitions of commissioned art by world renowned artists can be viewed year round.

Tickets are still available. Please see Members page to download a copy of the full description and Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Bonita Billman, "America's Gilded Age: Cottages of Newport, Part II"
May
23
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Bonita Billman, "America's Gilded Age: Cottages of Newport, Part II"

America’s Gilded Age: Cottages of Newport, Part II
Bonita Billman, instructor in art history, Georgetown University

There were many playgrounds for the rich in Gilded Age America. No vacation spot captured more clientele than Newport, Rhode Island. The preeminent architects of Gilded Age New York City also designed the summer homes (called “cottages” in the height of understatement)for the Vanderbilts, Astors and Goelets. This talk will be a brief look at some of the great Newport cottages, their interior decoration and architectural styles.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Bonita Billman, "America's Gilded Age: Mansions of Gotham, Part I"
May
16
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Bonita Billman, "America's Gilded Age: Mansions of Gotham, Part I"

America’s Gilded Age: Mansions of Gotham, Part I
Bonita Billman, instructor in art history, Georgetown University

It was called the Gilded Age in America—a time of dazzling architecture, extravagant clothes, fabulous art, and lots and lots of money. In the years after the Civil War—roughly 1870-1910—American industry boomed and fortunes were made. So-called captains of industry and robber barons were the era’s Masters of the Universe. The nouveaux riches built homes and vacation cottages, became avid consumers of expensive clothes and art, and indulged in leisure-time activities as never before. We will explore the gilded domestic architecture in Manhattan and Newport.

As Manhattan progressed northward, domestic architecture moved at the forward edge. The march up socially prestigious Fifth Avenue was marked by new mansions for the cultural elite. The Astors, Vanderbilts Whitneys, and others cemented their social status by commissioning lavish mansions modeled on European palaces. Designed by eminent architects like Richard Morris Hunt and Stanford White of McKim, Mead and White, these Gilded Age mansions were full of art treasures and goods harvested in Europe. Most of these homes were demolished within decades of their construction; the remaking of Gotham being relentless. This talk will be a brief look at some of the most distinguished mansions (inside and outside) built c1880-1906 for the most distinguished plutocratic families in New York City.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY: BMA Talk & Tours, "Shifting Views - People & Politics in Contemporary African Art"
May
11
1:30pm 1:30pm

MEMBERS-ONLY: BMA Talk & Tours, "Shifting Views - People & Politics in Contemporary African Art"

Talk & Tour: Shifting Views: People & Politics in Contemporary African Art
Shannen Hill, associate curator for African arts, Baltimore Museum of Art

Shannen Hill will introduce us to the BMA’s contemporary African art holdings, focusing on the Museum’s first exhibition of contemporary art from Africa drawn from its own collection. This exhibition features photographs, prints, and drawings by David Goldblatt, Gavin Jantjes, William Kentridge, Julie Mehretu, Senam Okudzeto, Robin Rhode, and Diane Victor. Each artist offers pointedly political perspectives on the lives of Africans and their diasporic descendants. Members are encouraged to visit the exhibit (on the ground floor) before or after the talk.

Tickets are still available. Please see Members page to download a copy of the full description and Reply Form.

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AUTHOR'S TALK: Anna Celenza, "Jazz Italian Style"
May
9
1:30pm 1:30pm

AUTHOR'S TALK: Anna Celenza, "Jazz Italian Style"

Jazz Italian Style, Author Talk and Book Signing
Anna Harwell Celenza, Thomas Caestecker professor of music, Georgetown University

In Jazz Italian Style, Anna Celenza will explore a complex era in music history, when politics and popular culture collided with national identity and technology. When jazz arrived in Italy at the conclusion of World War I, it quickly became part of the local music culture. In Italy, thanks to the gramophone and radio, many Italian listeners paid little attention to a performer's national and ethnic identity. Nick LaRocca (Italian-American), Gorni Kramer (Italian), the Trio Lescano (Jewish-Dutch), and Louis Armstrong (African-American), to name a few, all found equal footing in the Italian soundscape. The book reveals how Italians made jazz their own, and how, by the mid-1930s, a genre of jazz distinguishable from American varieties and supported by Mussolini began to flourish in Northern Italy and in its turn influenced Italian- American musicians. Most importantly, the book recovers a lost repertoire and an array of musicians whose stories and performances are compelling and well worth remembering.

Celenza's book will be available for purchase directly before and after the lecture.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers 

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MEMBERS-ONLY: Artist Talk and Tour, "The Ground", Michael Jones McKean
May
4
1:30pm 1:30pm

MEMBERS-ONLY: Artist Talk and Tour, "The Ground", Michael Jones McKean

Baltimore Field Trip:
The Contemporary’s recent commission, The Ground - Artist Talk and Tour

Tour led by the artist Michael Jones McKean
with The Contemporary’s Artistic Director Ginevra Shay

1:00 p.m. Depart Church of the Redeemer, 5603 N. Charles St.
1:30 p.m. Hutzler Brothers Palace Building, 200 N. Howard St

Hutzler Brothers Palace, erected 1888, and originally advertised as a “museum of merchandise” was the first department store of its kind in Baltimore. In the shell of this former emporium, McKean has fabricated a massive, multi-room, two-story structure, an architectonic labyrinth enfolding diverse aesthetic languages and multiple modes of representation. He merges the museological, the domestic, the store display, the geological, the theatrical, and the digital. In its totality, he has created an extended metaphor on “place”. Not place as a stagnant reality fixed in time, but as an emergent, fecund, and evolving set of conditions metabolizing past histories into the present.

Tickets are still available. Please see Members page to download a copy of the full description and Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Jennie Hirsh, "Biennials and Beyond: Venice, Kassel and More"
May
2
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Jennie Hirsh, "Biennials and Beyond: Venice, Kassel and More"

Biennials and Beyond: Venice, Kassel and More
Jennie Hirsh, art historian, director of critical studies at the Maryland Institute College of Art

What is the difference between a biennial and a biennale? What is the relationship between art fairs and world’s fairs? Why have so many cities across the globe begun hosting biennials in the past two decades? This lecture will explain the nineteenth-century origins of international art fairs, in general, as well as the creation of specific events such as the Biennale in Venice, Italy (founded in 1895) and Documenta in Kassel, Germany (founded in 1955), both of which are scheduled to open in early summer 2017. In examining the particular political, economic, and artistic motivation behind establishing and developing these groundbreaking exhibitions, the lecture will explore the history of these two exhibitions from their founding up until present day. The lecture will include historical case studies as well as artists to be featured in this summer’s fairs. This lecture will be delivered in anticipation of summer 2017’s so-called “Grand Tour,” when the Venice Biennale coincides with both Documenta and Skulptur Projeckte Münster (held every ten years since 1977).

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Earle Havens, "Obelisks!"
Apr
25
1:30pm 1:30pm

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Earle Havens, "Obelisks!"

Obelisks! Egyptomania and the Enigma of Hieroglyphs in Renaissance Art
Earle Havens, Nancy H. Hall curator of rare books and manuscripts at the Sheridan Libraries of Johns Hopkins University and adjunct assistant professor, department of history

Ancient Rome marked its imperial achievements in high symbolic style by transporting a host of monolithic stone obelisks from their original seats in Egypt, raising them up high again as spoils of conquest in the central squares and circuses of the Eternal City. All but one fell down in a symbolic echo of Rome’s own decline and fall in the centuries that followed, only to be resurrected in seeming miracles of engineering during the Renaissance. The resurgence of this cultural phenomenon coincided with a new era of “Egyptomania,” perhaps most conspicuously preserved in late 15th-century paintings of ancient Egyptian pagan deities that adorned the Vatican apartments of the pope himself. Scholars wondered at the enigmas left by this most ancient of cultures, and speculated wildly about the true meaning of the hieroglyphs inscribed upon these mysterious masses of stone. Could those marks reveal the ultimate secrets, the original wisdom of the world’s first archpriests? In this illustrated talk we will journey across 3500 years of human history, from the XII Dynasty of the Egyptian Middle Kingdom, to the age of Michelangelo, onwards to the latter-day obelisks that now form the urban hearts of the Place de Concorde in Paris and the National Mall in D.C. —echoed in Baltimore’s very own monument in Mt. Vernon Square.

Members-only Tour; Please use the blue Reply Form to RSVP.

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: National Museum of African American History & Culture, Washington D.C.
Apr
20
9:15am 9:15am

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: National Museum of African American History & Culture, Washington D.C.

This trip is fully subscribed with a wait list. ASG will plan another trip to the NMAAHC as soon as possible.

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture. To date, the Museum has collected more than 36,000 artifacts and nearly 100,000 individuals have become charter members. There are four pillars upon which the NMAAHC stands: It provides an opportunity for those who are interested in African American culture to explore and revel in this history through interactive exhibitions. It helps all Americans see how their stories, their histories, and their cultures are shaped and informed by global influences. It explores what it means to be an American and share how American values like resiliency, optimism, and spirituality are reflected in African American history and culture. It serves as a place of collaboration that reaches beyond Washington, D.C. to engage new audiences and to work with the myriad of museums and educational institutions that have explored and preserved this important history well before this museum was created.

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LECTURE: Ed McCarthy, "Music and Medicine"
Apr
18
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Ed McCarthy, "Music and Medicine"

Music & Medicine
Ed McCarthy, professor of pathology and orthopedic surgery at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

As a cellist and surgeon, Dr. McCarthy has been fascinated by the overlapping effect of music and medicine. In this lecture he will explore the symbolic relationship between musical harmony and health, along with the idea of the human body as a musical instrument. In addition, Dr. McCarthy will discuss an unusual set of diseases peculiar to musicians, specifically looking at several great composers and how their illnesses affected their work.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: "Indecent" and MoMA, New York City
Apr
12
6:30am 6:30am

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: "Indecent" and MoMA, New York City

NYC Day Trip: MoMA and Indecent by Paula Vogel

Museum of Modern Art, self-guided tour – Recommended exhibitions include Nan Goldin: The Ballad of Sexual Dependency, Tony Oursler’s Imponderable, and Unfinished Conversations: New Work from the Collection.

INDECENT is the new play from Pulitzer Prize winner Paula Vogel inspired by the true story of the controversial 1923 Broadway debut of Sholem Asch’s God of Vengeance. Created by Vogel and director Rebecca Taichman and set at a time when waves of immigrants were changing the face of America, this play with music is a riveting look at an explosive moment in theatrical history and comes to Broadway from its critically acclaimed, sold-out run at the Vineyard Theatre. Theater critic Judy Rousuck will accompany us and host a post-show discussion with Paula Vogel.

Tickets are still available. Please see Members page to download a copy of the full description and Reply Form. 

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LECTURE: Rebecca Brown, "Both Here and There: “Transnational” Asian Contemporary Art"
Apr
4
1:30pm 1:30pm

LECTURE: Rebecca Brown, "Both Here and There: “Transnational” Asian Contemporary Art"

Both Here and There: “Transnational” Asian Contemporary Art
Rebecca Brown, associate professor in history of art and chair of Advanced Academic Program in Museum Studies at Johns Hopkins University, Editor-in-Chief of Art Journal

Korean-born, US-based artist Do Ho Suh stitches panels of translucent, silky fabric together to reconstruct the space of his apartments in New York and Seoul, producing ethereal, floating spaces in the gallery. Amsterdam-based Chinese born artist Ni Haifeng paints his body with designs from Chinese blue-and-white porcelain created for the Dutch market, linking mercantile flows of objects with the movement of his own body around the world. Delhi-based Vivan Sundaram collages photographs of his aunt, the artist Amrita Sher-Gil, tracing her life and work as she and her family moved from Simla in the foothills of the Himalayas, to Paris and Budapest and back, putting her global travel in motion again in his photographic works. These artists all explore the cosmopolitan flows of artists and art objects that shape our world today and have done so for centuries. We will delve into the questions these works raise, exploring what it means to be “transnational” and asking whether that means we should still group artists based on the location of their birth.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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