FILM: Shoplifters (2018) by Hirokazu Kore-eda, with Linda DeLibro
Jul
30
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Shoplifters (2018) by Hirokazu Kore-eda, with Linda DeLibro

  • Notre Dame University - Knott Science Center Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Japanese Cinema, Yesterday and Today
Shoplifters (2018) 121 minutes by Hirokazu Kore-eda
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Program in Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University 

Shoplifters - In this beautifully observed tale, a family of petty thieves living on the margins of contemporary Tokyo takes in an abandoned child. What ensues over the following year is by turns wryly funny and deeply moving, a chronicle of human connection, love and loss.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM: Tampopo (1985) by Jûzô Itami, with Chris Reed
Jul
18
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Tampopo (1985) by Jûzô Itami, with Chris Reed

  • Notre Dame University - Knott Science Center Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Japanese Cinema, Yesterday and Today
Tampopo (1985) 114 minutes by Jûzô Itami
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair, Film & Moving Image Department, Stevenson University

Tampopo - Food, sex and a delightful riff on the clash of cultures combine in Itami’s hip expression of a rising new Japanese sensibility.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM SERIES: Hidden Fortress (1958) by Akira Kurosawa, with Chris Reed
Jul
16
1:30 PM13:30

FILM SERIES: Hidden Fortress (1958) by Akira Kurosawa, with Chris Reed

  • Notre Dame University - Knott Science Center Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Japanese Cinema, Yesterday and Today
Hidden Fortress (1958) 126 minutes by Akira Kurosawa
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair, Film & Moving Image Department, Stevenson University

Hidden Fortress - the film from which George Lucas liberally stole his plot for Star Wars, this tale of adventure and derring-do follows a princess in disguise as she strives to regain her throne, helped by a powerful general-in-exile and two comic sidekicks.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM: Ugetsu monogatari (1953) by Kenji Mizoguchi, with Linda DeLibro
Jul
9
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Ugetsu monogatari (1953) by Kenji Mizoguchi, with Linda DeLibro

  • Notre Dame University - Knott Science Center Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Japanese Cinema, Yesterday and Today
Ugetsu monogatari (1953) 96 minutes by Kenji Mizoguchi
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Program in Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Ugetsu monogatari - Based on author Ueda Akinari’s collection of nine supernatural tales of the Ming dynasty, Ugetsu monogatari (or “Tales of Ugetsu”) tells the story of a man who abandons his wife and son for a female ghost, enduring tragedy as he discovers the wages of supernatural sin.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM: Late Spring (1949) by Yasujirō Ozu, with Chris Reed
Jul
2
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Late Spring (1949) by Yasujirō Ozu, with Chris Reed

  • Notre Dame University - Knott Science Center Auditorium (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Japanese Cinema, Yesterday and Today
Late Spring (1949) 108 minutes by Yasujirō Ozu
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair, Film & Moving Image Department, Stevenson University

Late Spring - A father and widower, concerned about his twentysomething daughter’s ostensibly dwindling marriage prospects, works to ensure that she find a partner, despite what losing her presence at home would mean to his own life. A perfect example of Ozu’s masterfully understated craft, Late Spring is as lovely as it is bittersweet. (with Chris Reed)

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Rena Hoisington, "Some Thoughts on the Development of Aquatint in 18th-Century Europe"
Jun
25
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Rena Hoisington, "Some Thoughts on the Development of Aquatint in 18th-Century Europe"

Some Thoughts on the Development of Aquatint in 18th-Century Europe
Rena Hoisington, curator and head of the department of old master prints at the National Gallery of Art

Invented in the Netherlands in the 1650s, aquatint was not employed broadly by artists in Europe until the second half of the eighteenth century. The increasing use of this tonal intaglio printmaking technique at this time corresponds with a growing interest in studying, collecting, and multiplying drawings. By supplementing the line work of etching with a means to render tone in subtle ways, aquatint offered a new and exciting method to replicate ink and wash drawings, especially when these works were printed in brown ink. Early practitioners of the medium included Jean-Baptiste Le Prince in France, Paul Sandby in England, Giovanni David in Italy, and Francisco de Goya in Spain. This talk offers an overview on the beginnings of aquatint, the subject of a forthcoming exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: "Day Trip to Potomac, MD. Temple of Art: Glenstone"
Jun
22
8:30 AM08:30

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: "Day Trip to Potomac, MD. Temple of Art: Glenstone"

Day Trip to Potomac, MD. Temple of Art: Glenstone

ASG is pleased to offer members a trip to the newly expanded Glenstone, Mitchell and Emily Rales’ private museum in Potomac, Maryland which reopened last fall unveiling the new Pavilions (adding 204,000 square feet of gallery space) and a redesigned campus.  Glenstone seamlessly integrates art, architecture, and landscape into a serene and contemplative environment creating a temple of art that works to slow down visitors. The collection comprises iconic examples of modern and contemporary art that represent pivotal shifts in the perception and understanding of the art of our time. The architecture is essential, providing a minimal design to complement the collection and experience of viewing art. Glenstone offers nearly 300 acres of landscape which is fully integrated with the architecture and art. The landscape includes paths, trails, streams, meadows, forests and outdoor sculptures throughout the grounds. Visiting Glenstone is an unhurried, uncrowded experience with art, architecture and landscape: a quiet realm of serenity, beauty, and peacefulness. 

Members-only; please see full description for more details and RSVP via the Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Kevin Tervala, "Earthen Architecture of Africa: Buildings & Belief"
Jun
18
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Kevin Tervala, "Earthen Architecture of Africa: Buildings & Belief"

Earthen Architecture of Africa: Buildings & Belief
Kevin Tervala, associate curator of African art at the Baltimore Museum of Art

Across the African continent, men and women have built monumental and aesthetically innovative structures from mud and earthen material. In large kingdoms and small-scale societies, these buildings were used not just as dwellings or gathering spaces, but as ways for the people to express fundamental social, cultural, and religious beliefs. This lecture draws on the architectural expression of states and societies in Benin, Burkina Faso, Ghana, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, and Togo and explores how people used the buildings to express themselves. Through this lecture, Tervala will also track how the entrance of Islam in the 7th century restructured the social and architecture fabric of these western African societies and cultures.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY OVERNIGHT TRIP: "ASG Visits the Mile-High City: Art & Architecture in Denver, Colorado"
Jun
12
to Jun 14

MEMBERS-ONLY OVERNIGHT TRIP: "ASG Visits the Mile-High City: Art & Architecture in Denver, Colorado"

ASG Visits the Mile-High City: Art & Architecture in Denver, Colorado

 Nestled along the South Platte River, the Mile High City has been a focal point for the Rocky Mountain Region since the first gold miners made a claim and established the city in the mid-19th century. But the last decade has seen more change and growth than imagined, with Denver attracting 100,000 new residents. These sharply changing demographics, and the city’s unique history as a gateway to the West, have contributed to the quickly-evolving and diverse fine and performing arts scene. Join ASG on a tour of the highlights of Denver’s museum and cultural districts, along with the best restaurants (served with a side of mountain views). The trip will include tours of four museums (Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver Art Museum, Clyfford Still Museum and Kirkland Museum of Fine & Decorative Arts) and a guided architecture tour designed especially for Art Seminar Group. We will also visit the legendary Air Force Academy outside of Colorado Springs, a modernist campus resonating with pride and symbolism via a radical midcentury design whose master plan was developed in the 1950’s by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. We will stay at the historic Brown Palace Hotel in downtown Denver.

Members-only; please see full description for more details and RSVP via the Reply Form.

 

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LECTURE: Stephanie Ybarra, "Baltimore Center Stage’s Role in American Theater"
Jun
11
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Stephanie Ybarra, "Baltimore Center Stage’s Role in American Theater"

Baltimore Center Stage’s Role in American Theater
Stephanie Ybarra, artistic director, Baltimore Center Stage 

Stephanie Ybarra brings vast experience with theaters from across the country, most recently at The Public Theater in New York, to her new role as artistic director of Baltimore Center Stage which she joined just last fall. Stephanie is the most recent addition to Baltimore’s cultural community and another example of our city’s ability to attract outstanding artistic talent. She has programmed BCS’s upcoming season for 2019-2020 and will use that program to discuss how the American theater is evolving and the way Baltimore Center Stage is positioned to lead the field not only in what it produces, but also how it is produced.  

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "Revisiting The Renaissance: Part 5: The Creation of an Ideal and its Aftermath: Classicism and Counter-Classicism"
Jun
4
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "Revisiting The Renaissance: Part 5: The Creation of an Ideal and its Aftermath: Classicism and Counter-Classicism"

Revisiting The Renaissance: The Key Ingredients of a Cultural Transformation, 1400-1600, Part 5: The Creation of an Ideal and its Aftermath: Classicism and Counter-Classicism
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland

See series description on January 23 for more information.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

Originally scheduled for 2/27, rescheduled due to inclement weather.

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LECTURE: Ellen Lupton, "Bauhaus Graphic Design"
May
28
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Ellen Lupton, "Bauhaus Graphic Design"

Bauhaus Graphic Design
Ellen Lupton, senior curator of contemporary design at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

2019 is the centenary of the founding of the Bauhaus school in Weimar, Germany, founded by architect Walter Gropius. In operation for only 14 years before being shut down by the National Socialist Party, as part of the Nazi regime, it has become the most influential art and design school in history. This talk explores the origins and impact of Bauhaus fonts, books, ads, and exhibitions, which shook the world of graphic design and shaped the dynamic, multimedia design practices of today. Ellen will offer a sneak preview of her upcoming exhibition about Bauhaus master Herbert Bayer, opening at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum in the fall of 2019.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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PERFORMANCE: Holland/Coots, "The Influences and Evolution of American Classic Jazz"
May
21
1:30 PM13:30

PERFORMANCE: Holland/Coots, "The Influences and Evolution of American Classic Jazz"

The Influences and Evolution of American Classic Jazz

Brian Holland (piano) world renowned, Grammy-nominated recording artist
Danny Coots (drums) world renowned, Grammy-winning recording artist

Holland/Coots will present a performance and lecture on early American jazz from pre-ragtime influences, both ethnic and social, to the present day performance practice of referencing classic jazz styles. The program not only describes how each period style is influenced and evolves into the next, but Holland and Coots demonstrate the nuances and subtleties of these transitions. Holland/Coots are considered two of the foremost performers who specialize in improvisation within these styles. They are able to effectively and genially demonstrate the communication necessary between musicians to provide a seamless and entertaining performance.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art as Speculative Fiction"
May
14
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Art as Speculative Fiction"

Art as Speculative Fiction   

Paula Burleigh, visiting assistant professor of art, Allegheny College, and director of the Allegheny Art Gallery

This lecture examines artists working in the 21st century who use strategies more familiar to the field of speculative fiction than to the visual arts. Such strategies include world building around themes such as the supernatural, magic, human-animal hybridity, and the extraterrestrial. Artists including ruby onyinyechi amanze, Amy Cutler, Fay Ku, and Wangechi Mutu respond to what some cultural theorists have described as the current situation of being post-human and post-nature. Moving beyond anthropocentric paradigms that privilege the human experience, we will discuss artists who create fantastical, sci-fi leaning narratives to picture the ways in which the fate of humans is inextricably tied to the animals, plants, and other non-human critters that co-populate our world. At least partially in response to the growing urgency of climate change, artists discussed here use a variety of media—collage, drawing, printmaking, painting—to explore the ways in which we might begin to understand humans as part of a larger, non-hierarchical network of inter-species relationships.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: "Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s with Oliver Shell"
May
8
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: "Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s with Oliver Shell"

Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s
Oliver Shell, associate curator of European art, The Baltimore Museum of Art

 Curator Oliver Shell will give a talk and exhibition tour on the BMA’s current exhibit “Monsters & Myths: Surrealism and War in the 1930s and 1940s”. Nearly 90 Surrealist masterworks of the 1930s and 1940s by artists such as Salvador Dalí, Pablo Picasso, Max Ernst and André Masson are presented through a timely lens—that of war, violence, and exile. Despite the political and personal turmoil brought on by the Spanish Civil War and World War II, avant-garde artists in Europe and those who sought refuge in the United States pushed themselves to create some of the most potent and striking images of the Surrealist movement. Monstrosities in the real world bred monsters in paintings and sculpture, on film, and in the pages of journals and artists’ books, resulting in a period of extraordinary creativity.

Members-only; Pre-registration required: please RSVP via the Reply Form.

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LECTURE: David Gariff, "German Expressionism And Degenerate Art, Part 2"
Apr
30
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: David Gariff, "German Expressionism And Degenerate Art, Part 2"

German Expressionism And Degenerate Art, Part 2
David Gariff, Senior Lecturer at the National Gallery of Art

David Gariff continues his overview of German Expressionism and Degenerate Art in Germany. See the April 23 series description for more information.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY OVERNIGHT TRIP: "Washington Theater Weekend" with Murray Biggs
Apr
26
to Apr 28

MEMBERS-ONLY OVERNIGHT TRIP: "Washington Theater Weekend" with Murray Biggs

Washington Theater Weekend with Murray Biggs

A weekend of theatrical immersion in Washington, D.C. with Murray Biggs, special lecturer for Yale Educational Travel, Yale University spanning 2 nights. We will see three plays over the weekend accompanied by professor Biggs who will also lead illuminating discussions of each play. ASG has accommodations in place for members at the Dupont Circle hotel.

Murray Biggs, semi-retired adjunct associate professor of English, theater studies, and most recently film at Yale, is known throughout the campus, and with alumni everywhere, for his dynamic teaching style that inspires great enthusiasm and active participation. He has led renowned week-long and weekend theater seminars throughout the U.S., Canada, and the UK.  Several ASG members have traveled with Murray and recommend him very highly.   

Members-only; a full description and Reply Form will be distributed to members in January. 

 

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LECTURE: David Gariff, "German Expressionism And Degenerate Art, Part 1"
Apr
23
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: David Gariff, "German Expressionism And Degenerate Art, Part 1"

German Expressionism And Degenerate Art, Part 1
David Gariff, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art

Germany around 1900 was a volatile contradiction - modernizing rapidly yet deeply conservative in its values. This was fertile ground for the birth of German expressionism represented by the paintings and sculptures of Ernst Barlach, Max Beckmann, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Franz Marc, Otto Müller, Emil Nolde, and others. With the rise of national socialism in the 1930s in Germany, many of these avant-garde artists and the movements of which they were a part came to be labeled “degenerate.” David Gariff explores the nature of German expressionist art against the backdrop of two important exhibitions mounted by the Nazis in 1937: The Great German Art Exhibition, on July 18, and the Entartete Kunst (Degenerate Art) exhibition, on July 19. Through these two exhibitions and their related documents and propaganda, the Nazis sought to establish and support the reputation of the approved art of the Third Reich, while at the same time to unleash a destructive “tornado” (as Hitler referred to it) against modern art.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Vanessa Hoheb, "Monumental Sculptures:  The Artist/Artisan Collaboration"
Apr
16
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Vanessa Hoheb, "Monumental Sculptures:  The Artist/Artisan Collaboration"

Monumental Sculptures:  The Artist/Artisan Collaboration
Vanessa Hoheb, artisan and artist

Vanessa Hoheb grew up spending time in her father’s sculpture studio. At age 16, she began her formal apprenticeship in the studio, learning the skills and techniques of sculptural enlarging, mold making, casting, and restoration. The early years in the studio were filled with the excitement of working for artists Willem DeKooning, Louise Nevelson, Isamu Noguchi, Frederick Hart, and Jasper Johns.  Hoheb became a widely-recognized master artisan in these techniques. Between 1980 and 1984, Willem DeKooning, one of America’s most influential artists and a leader of the 20th century Abstract Expressionist movement, engaged Hoheb Studios in New York to enlarge three of his hand-sized sculptures to monumental size. So, how is a palm-sized clay sculpture turned into a monumental bronze artwork? The speaker will provide an in-depth presentation on the creative and technical processes used in the development of these important works while offering an eyewitness’s glimpse into who deKooning was as an artist and person. 

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Joseph Cassar, "Surrealism and the Anxieties of the 20th Century"
Apr
10
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Joseph Cassar, "Surrealism and the Anxieties of the 20th Century"

Surrealism and the Anxieties of the 20th Century
Joseph Cassar, professor of art, University of Maryland University College and the New York Times Knowledge Network

Sigmund Freud’s publication in 1900 “On the Interpretation of Dreams” regarded dreams as the serious business of our lives. The Surrealist movement develops in the early 1920s with art that disquiets the viewer, sabotaging the existing order of things, relating theories of psychology to the idea of creativity and the production of art. The dream became equivalent to imagination itself. This seminar explores the origins of surrealism, the surrealist manifesto by Andre Breton, its widespread influence and the art of some of its most prominent members such as Max Ernst, Jean Arp, Joan Miro, Andre Masson, Rene Magritte, Alberto Giacometti, Salvador Dali, and others.

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LECTURE: David Gariff, "Modern Sculpture In The National Gallery of Art"
Apr
2
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: David Gariff, "Modern Sculpture In The National Gallery of Art"

Modern Sculpture In The National Gallery of Art
David Gariff, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art

The East Building of the National Gallery of Art houses an impressive collection of modern sculptures displayed throughout its many levels. Henry Moore’s Knife Edge Mirror Two Piece, Anthony Caro’s National Gallery Ledge Piece, and the enormous mobile, Untitled, by Alexander Calder were commissioned for the opening of the building in 1978 and are prominently displayed at the entrance and in the atrium. Other large-scale works by Max Ernst, Andy Goldsworthy, Isamu Noguchi, Richard Serra, and David Smith are also found in the atrium. Throughout the upstairs galleries, one can trace the history of 20th-century sculpture in parallel with the history of 20th-century painting.  David Gariff leads a tour of the Gallery’s modern sculptures through this lecture.  

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "Revisiting The Renaissance: Part 4: From the Sacred to the Secular: The Role of Patrons"
Mar
27
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "Revisiting The Renaissance: Part 4: From the Sacred to the Secular: The Role of Patrons"

Revisiting The Renaissance: The Key Ingredients of a Cultural Transformation, 1400-1600, Part 4: From the Sacred to the Secular: The Role of Patrons
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland

See series description on January 23 for more information.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

Originally Scheduled for 2/20, this lecture was rescheduled due to inclement weather.

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LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Contemporary African-American Art, Part 3: My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers"
Mar
20
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Contemporary African-American Art, Part 3: My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers"

Contemporary African-American Art, Part 3: My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers
Michael Salcman, art historian, poet, and neurosurgeon

Salman’s final lecture of the series: My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers is devoted to the black pioneers of abstract art: Norman Lewis, Alma Thomas, Sam Gilliam and Jack Whitten among them; and abstract sculptors like David Hammons, Mel Edwards, and Martin Puryear.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Contemporary African-American Art, Part 2: I am the Darker Brother"
Mar
13
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Contemporary African-American Art, Part 2: I am the Darker Brother"

Contemporary African-American Art, Part 2: I am the Darker Brother
Michael Salcman, art historian, poet, and neurosurgeon

The second lecture in a series on contemporary African-American art by Dr. Salcman: I am the Darker Brother will cover the recuperation of black presence from the 1980s to the present within a wide variety of representational and conceptual formats: photography (Carrie Mae Weems, Lorna Simpson); neo-expressionist and abstract painting (Basquiat and Mark Bradford); conceptual art (Fred Wilson, Glenn Ligon, Kara Walker, Theaster Gates); portraiture and landscape (Kerry James Marshall, Kehinde Wiley, Mickalene Thomas, Barkley Hendricks, Amy Sherald).

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Contemporary African-American Art: Part 1: A Dream Deferred"
Mar
6
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Contemporary African-American Art: Part 1: A Dream Deferred"

Contemporary African-American Art
Michael Salcman, art historian, poet, and neurosurgeon

 Dr. Salcman is pleased to present a lecture series on the subject of contemporary art by African-American artists for Art Seminar Group. After a long period of significant neglect, African-American Art has become one of the most exciting curatorial areas in contemporary art, a vital source of expansion and revisionism of the historical canon and an important sector of today’s art market.

 Part 1: A Dream Deferred            

 Part 2: I Am the Darker Brother

 Part 3: My Soul Has Grown Deep Like the Rivers

In the first lecture of the series, A Dream Deferred, the historical context of work by African-American artists will be presented with brief discussions about the first well-known African-American artist, Joshua Johnson, a Marylander, and Henry Ossawa Tanner, as well as issues that have previously excluded or delayed proper recognition of African-American artists. We will explore the figurative work of artists in the 1950s and 1960s and influenced by the Harlem Renaissance like Horace Pippin, Jacob Lawrence, and Romare Bearden.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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Feb
27
1:30 PM13:30

NO LECTURE

Revisiting The Renaissance: The Key Ingredients of a Cultural Transformation, 1400-1600, Part 5: The Creation of an Ideal and its Aftermath: Classicism and Counter-Classicism with Aneta Georgievska-Shine, originally scheduled for 2/27, is rescheduled for 3/27.

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(canceled) LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "Revisiting The Renaissance: Part 4: From the Sacred to the Secular: The Role of Patrons"
Feb
20
1:30 PM13:30

(canceled) LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "Revisiting The Renaissance: Part 4: From the Sacred to the Secular: The Role of Patrons"

This lecture has been canceled due to inclement weather and will be rescheduled for 3/27/2019.

Revisiting The Renaissance: The Key Ingredients of a Cultural Transformation, 1400-1600, Part 4: From the Sacred to the Secular: The Role of Patrons
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland

See series description on January 23 for more information.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: Theater Trip to Washington, D.C. to Arena Stage for Kleptocracy by Kenneth Lin
Feb
13
9:15 AM09:15

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: Theater Trip to Washington, D.C. to Arena Stage for Kleptocracy by Kenneth Lin

Theater Trip to Washington, D.C. to Arena Stage for Kleptocracy by Kenneth Lin

 Kleptocracy has been described as a “Fearless political journey”. It is one of the most pivotal moments in history — the Soviet Union has collapsed. In the ensuing rampage of hyper-capitalism, the Oligarchs, a new class of robber barons, plunge Russia into a terrifying dark age of chaos and corruption. When the richest and most ruthless Oligarch attempts to reform and open Russian markets to the world, he’s confronted by a young Vladimir Putin who is charting his own path to power. This world-premiere drama by Kenneth Lin (House of Cards) turns the spotlight on U.S. - Russia relations when crude oil is the language of diplomacy and events that dominate today’s headlines are first set in motion.

 Members-only; please see full description for more details and RSVP via the Reply Form. 

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LECTURE: Judy Rousuck, "The Silver Screen Storms the Stage"
Feb
12
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Judy Rousuck, "The Silver Screen Storms the Stage"

Newly added!

The Silver Screen Storms the Stage
Judy Rousuck, former Baltimore Sun theater critic and current theater critic, WYPR

 Remember when hit Broadway musicals would be turned into movies? Think, “The Sound of Music," “The King and I”, “The Music Man,” to name a few. But that was then. Ever since “The Producers” and “Hairspray” struck box office gold on Broadway, the pattern has reversed. Today, almost half of the musicals on the Great White Way started out on screen -- shows like “Waitress,” “The Lion King,” “Mean Girls,” even last year’s Tony Award winner, “The Band’s Visit.” And, this Spring brings more: “Beetlejuice” and “Tootsie.” What is driving this trend? What does a movie need to make a good stage musical? J. Wynn Rousuck (theater critic at WYPR and former longtime critic at The Baltimore Sun) returns to explore this phenomenon in an illustrated lecture.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

Note: The previously scheduled Joan DeJean lecture on embroidery has been cancelled.

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