LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: David Hockney"
Jun
5
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: David Hockney"

Artists Working Now: David Hockney
Paula Burleigh, senior teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

David Hockney (b. 1937) is one of the most celebrated painters working today. Although his work beyond the 1960s has, to some degree, eluded serious critical commentary, a recent retrospective co–organized by the Tate Britain and the Metropolitan Museum of Art suggests this is changing. This talk surveys both the trajectory and reception of Hockney’s work over the span of his 60-year career, including his early years depicting swimming pools in Los Angeles, the Polaroid photo–collages of the 1980s, and the exuberant landscapes he continues to make today. Finally, we will discuss Hockney’s embrace of technology in his recent work with fax machines, video, and the iPad, experiments that demonstrate his uncommon willingness to continually challenge the parameters of his practice.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​David Gariff, "The Art of Paul Cézanne: The Eye in Service to the Mind"
Jun
12
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​David Gariff, "The Art of Paul Cézanne: The Eye in Service to the Mind"

The Art of Paul Cézanne: The Eye in Service to the Mind
David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art

Paul Cézanne sought to systematize the randomness of impressionism and to find an analytical way of seeing the world. His paintings express a new vocabulary of art and a new interpretation of the nature of visual experience. Cézanne's working methods grew out of his intent to produce paintings that captured solid form rather than the fugitive effects of his influential French predecessors. His subject matter ranged widely to include portraits, self-portraits, landscapes, scenes of everyday activities such as card playing, and still lifes.

Cézanne's belief that "there are two things in the painter, the eye and the mind; each of them should aid the other" was taken to heart by the young Picasso. In 1943, Picasso declared that Paul Cézanne was “my one and only master.” Indeed, with the artistic achievement of Cézanne, modern art would chart a new and challenging course. This lecture is an exploration of Cézanne's revolutionary art and an introduction to the Cézanne Portraits exhibition at the National Gallery of Art (on view March 25-July 1, 2018).

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard"
Jun
19
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard"

Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard
Paula Burleigh, senior teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

The work of New York–based artist Zoe Leonard (b. 1961) exemplifies a tradition of photographers who have challenged photography’s traditional identity as an objective document. Perhaps counterintuitively, Leonard has done so through often straight, unmanipulated photographs. Surveying her work from the 1980s to now, we will see how Leonard addresses questions that are central to the history of photography, from the complex role of place and the constructions of identity to the medium’s relationship with death and mourning. Most importantly, Leonard’s work reveals the strange power of pictures: capable of alternately absorbing and generating emotional investments, cultural biases, (mis)remembrances, and nostalgia in the mind of the viewer. While Leonard is most widely known as a photographer, she actually works across a wide range of media. Consequently, we will think about how the questions that drive her photography equally inform her practice in installation and sculpture. 

Note: The exhibition Zoe Leonard: Survey is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through June 10, 2018.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Laura Owens"
Jun
26
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Laura Owens"

Artists Working Now: Laura Owens
Paula Burleigh, senior teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

Laura Owens (b. 1970) was critical to the re–emergence of painting in the 21st century art world, and her work continues to challenge the core facets of the medium’s identity. For example, while we might typically think of paintings as autonomous objects, Owens has developed a practice in which paintings both implicate and respond to their sites of production and display. Looking at the development of her work since graduating from CalArts in 1994, we will see how she considers perceived conventions of taste through engaging with themes of kitsch, cuteness, craft, sincerity, and irony. Owens’ work also opens questions of how and whether the medium can and should expand in response to new technologies, one of the most pervasive questions for artists working today.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM: Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) 90 minutes, with Linda DeLibero
Jun
28
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) 90 minutes, with Linda DeLibero

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) 90 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Cléo from 5 to 7 -  Captures Paris in the 60’s with a real-time portrait of a pop singer set adrift in the city as she awaits the results of a medical test that she fears will confirm a fatal condition.  A compelling portrait of a self-centered young woman who gains some wisdom when faced with her own mortality.  

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 
SUMMER FILM SERIES

 The Desire to See:  Agnès Varda At 90
Celebrating the remarkable six-decade career of the legendary French New Wave filmmaker

As the leading female filmmaker of the French New Wave, Varda has created a body of work whose scope and significance equals that of any other major figure of the movement.  Early on she invented the term cinécriture (ciné-writing) to describe her work, meaning every aspect of a film she makes is chosen with a view to an intended effect, message or meaning. She has faithfully followed this approach in a diverse 60 year career in which she has alternated between fiction and documentary while pursuing a unique cinematic vision.  Always experimental, always personal, her films focus on themes of place and community, common people facing economic or social difficulties, the challenges faced by women and the meaning of memory.

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FILM: The Gleaners and I (2000) 82 minutes, with Linda DeLibero
Jul
3
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: The Gleaners and I (2000) 82 minutes, with Linda DeLibero

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Gleaners and I (2000) 82 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

The Gleaners and I – An uncommon profile of scavengers who collect what others throw out or leave behind.  A personal and philosophical inquiry into the practice of gathering what has been discarded or passed over.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM: Vagabond (1985) 105 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed
Jul
10
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Vagabond (1985) 105 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Vagabond (1985) 105 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair of Film & Moving Image, Stevenson University

Vagabond – A stunner that created waves upon its release, telling the story of a young homeless woman living rough in the southern French countryside who tries to survive winter by walking further and further, quicker and quicker…

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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FILM: Faces Places (2017) 89 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed
Jul
12
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Faces Places (2017) 89 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Faces Places (2017) 89 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair of Film & Moving Image, Stevenson University

Faces Places – Co-directed with the street artist JR, a captivating documentary that follows the journey of the two directors/artists/friends through the hidden corners and small villages of France, charming the locals and practicing their art along the way.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Eyes on Baltimore Tour: Sondheim Finalist Exhibition & Private Collection of Doreen Bolger
Jul
25
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Eyes on Baltimore Tour: Sondheim Finalist Exhibition & Private Collection of Doreen Bolger

Eyes on Baltimore Tour: Sondheim Finalist Exhibition & Private Collection of Doreen Bolger
Cecilia Wichmann, assistant curator of Contemporary Art, Baltimore Museum of Art and Doreen Bolger, former director of the Baltimore Museum of Art

ASG members are invited to join us for a two-part tour of the Sondheim Exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art and the private collection of Doreen Bolger, former head of the BMA who has become a beloved fixture within the Baltimore art community, well known for her passionate support of regional artists.

This event will begin with a guided tour of the Sondheim Finalists exhibition at the BMA led by Cecilia Wichmann, the Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art. The finalists for the 13th annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize are: multidisciplinary artist Erick Antonio Benitez, Laurel photographer Nakeya Brown, Baltimore sculptor Sutton Demlong, documentary photographer Nate Larson, Parkville painter Eunice Park and painter/fiber artist Stephen Towns, who is currently featured at the BMA in a solo exhibition entitled: Stephen Towns: Rumination and a Reckoning on view through September 2, 2018. Jurors for the prize include Lauren Cornell, Director of the Graduate Program at Bard College and Chief Curator of the Hessel Museum of Art in New York state, Margot Norton, Curator at the New Museum, NYC, and Kameelah Janan Rasheed, a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist and writer. The prestigious prize awards a $25,000 fellowship to a visual artist living and working in the Baltimore metropolitan region. The Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize is named in honor of Janet and Walter Sondheim who were instrumental civic leaders with a passion for public education for over 50 years. The Finalists Exhibition will be on view June 20 through August 5, 2018 at the BMA.

Following the tour of the Sondheim exhibit, Doreen Bolger, retired Director of the BMA, will welcome members to her 1870 rowhouse nearby to view her collection of some one hundred contemporary works by artists who are primarily Baltimore-based or regional. Her tour will focus on the work of several artists who are current or former Sondheim Finalists such as Melissa Dickenson, Neal Feather, Shaun Flynn, Nate Larson, René Treviño, and Wickerham & Lomax. Works are displayed amidst 19th-century furniture and decoration more expected for a house on the National Historic Register. Please note: there are steps involved to enter the house and to ascend to the second floor. Spoiler alert: some work is adult in nature! Good news: refreshments will be provided.        

Limited to 35 participants
Pre-registered members only                               

 

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LECTURE: Stanley Mazaroff, "A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure: the Remarkable Lives of George A. Lucas and His Art Collection"
May
22
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Stanley Mazaroff, "A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure: the Remarkable Lives of George A. Lucas and His Art Collection"

A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure: the Remarkable Lives of George A. Lucas and His Art Collection
Stanley Mazaroff, art historian

Stanley Mazaroff is a retired lawyer and art historian. Recognized annually in The Best Lawyers in America, Mazaroff retired early from his law firm to enroll in the art history department of Johns Hopkins University. Mazaroff is the author of Henry Walters and Bernard Berenson, Collector and Connoisseur, published by the Johns Hopkins University Press in 2010. His newest book, A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure (also published by the JHUP) has been praised by Doreen Bolger, former director of the BMA, Julia Marciari-Alexander, the director of the Walters Art Museum, and a host of curators and scholars.

A Paris Life, A Baltimore Treasure tells the fascinating story of George Lucas, a young man born and raised in Baltimore in the early 1800s, who after arriving in Paris in 1857 became the most important American art-agent for the most prominent and wealthy American art collectors of that time such as William Walters and William Vanderbilt, and how in the process he acquired a massive and incomparable personal collection of 18,000 works of French art and art-related information. The book further recounts the struggle he faced in finding a future home for his collection, the factors that influenced him to leave it to MICA and the battle that was fought in and out of court in the 1990s between MICA, the BMA and the Walters over ownership of the collection, resulting in the collection being glorified as a "Baltimore Treasure" which was forever saved for the people of Baltimore.   

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Jennifer Bedford, ""My feelings are changing…" Louise Nevelson at the Whitney and the Rose in 1967
May
15
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Jennifer Bedford, ""My feelings are changing…" Louise Nevelson at the Whitney and the Rose in 1967

"My feelings are changing…" Louise Nevelson at the Whitney and the Rose in 1967
Jennifer Bedford, independent curator and writer

When she was 68 years old, Louise Nevelson (1899-1988) received the long overdue recognition of her first retrospective exhibition, held in 1967 at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Rose Art Museum at Brandeis University. Seizing upon the opportunity, Nevelson attempted to make legible and accessible the immersive and elaborate sense of secrecy and mystery she embodied in her work and in her persona. In revisiting this historic exhibition, we can look again at now-lost installations and lesser-known sculptures as well as investigate Nevelson as a curator. How Nevelson’s exhibition came to be held at the Rose, then just six years old, is a story that needs to be told.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: J. Wynn Rousuck, "Musicals, Musicals Everywhere!"
May
8
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: J. Wynn Rousuck, "Musicals, Musicals Everywhere!"

Musicals, Musicals Everywhere! 
J. Wynn Rousuck, former Baltimore Sun theater critic and current theater critic, WYPR

In the Golden Age of Musical Theater, the Broadway musical was one of the leading forms of popular entertainment. The songs crossed over to the Billboard charts; audiences walked into shows already humming the tunes; and everyone with a piano owned the scores. Then came a lull. Musicals continued, but they didn’t wow the masses the way they once had. In this lecture, Judy Rousuck takes us on an illustrated tour of the paths Broadway musicals are taking to reclaim mainstream audiences.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Private Tour of Meyerhoff and Becker Collection
May
1
10:30 AM10:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Private Tour of Meyerhoff and Becker Collection

Private Tour of Meyerhoff and Becker Collection
With Bob Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker
10:30 am and 1:30 pm tours

Art Seminar Group invites you to the residence and galleries of Robert E. Meyerhoff for a private tour of Bob Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker’s remarkable collection of large-scale contemporary photography by such artists as Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, Thomas Struth, Thomas Demand, Jeff Wall and Cindy Sherman. We will also briefly see one of the most renowned collections of Post War art in the world, featuring works by Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg and Frank Stella, among others. Both collections are promised to the National Gallery of Art which featured the photography collection at the reopening of the East Wing in September 2016.

Space will be limited to 20 members for each tour. Pre-registered members only – this event is now filled to capacity. Driving directions will be provided to registered members. For questions, contact office@artseminargroup.org  

 

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Odyssey Jack Whitten Sculpture 1963-2017
Apr
28
11:30 AM11:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Odyssey Jack Whitten Sculpture 1963-2017

ODYSSEY Jack Whitten Sculpture 1963-2017

Private Talk & Tour with curator Katy Siegel, BMA senior programming & research curator and Thaw Chair in Modern American Art at Stony Brook University

Jack Whitten made his sculpture privately in Greece—even after he became one of the most important artists of his generation. For the first time ever, these revelatory works will be on view in an exhibition that features 40 sculptures carved from a diverse spectrum of materials — including wood, marble, copper, bone, and personal mementos —contextualized with African, Minoan, and Cycladic sculptures and other examples of objects that inspired Whitten across the years. A gallery dedicated to Whitten’s Black Monoliths, a series of paintings honoring African American figures, reveals the connection between Whitten’s paintings and his previously unknown sculptures, and marks the first time these works have been exhibited together.

We will gather in the auditorium at 11:30 am for an introduction to the work of Jack Whitten to be followed by a tour of the exhibit.  

Limited to 50 participants

Pre-registered members only – please RSVP via the Reply Form or email office@artseminargroup.org to register

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LECTURE: Ed McCarthy, "The Arts of Medicine"
Apr
24
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Ed McCarthy, "The Arts of Medicine"

The Arts of Medicine
Ed McCarthy, professor of pathology and orthopedic surgery at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Dr. McCarthy will explore the aesthetics of medical science through the various interfaces between art, medicine, and health. These include the use of medical illustration to obtain a deep understanding of disease and the proper delivery of healthcare, illnesses captured within works of visual art (either intentionally or unintentionally), images of doctors as portrayed in art, and finally, the use of art therapy for patients suffering with mental illness and trauma. Dr. McCarthy will also discuss the value of art analysis as a tool to instruct the diagnostic mind and increase one’s powers of observation.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Student Rehearsal and Talk: Serenade at the Baltimore School for the Arts
Apr
23
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Student Rehearsal and Talk: Serenade at the Baltimore School for the Arts

Student Rehearsal and Talk:  Serenade at the Baltimore School for the Arts
Deborah Wingert, choreographer and Régisseur, Balanchine Trust

We have a rare opportunity to see the dance talent at the Baltimore School for the Arts in action as they learn Balanchine’s classic dance Serenade, set to Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings. Our program will begin with observing the student dancers rehearsing in the studio under the direction of régisseur Deb Wingert, who learned the dance when Balanchine selected her to join the company of New York City Ballet. After the studio rehearsal, Deb will escort us to the Ballroom for a brief conversation before the students return to perform the piece in costume.  We’ll be privileged to stay after the performance to hear Deb give notes to the dancers – a rare peek behind the scenes.

Pre-registered members only – please RSVP via the Reply Form.

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Art, Architecture and Decorative Arts -- Historic Annapolis Walking Tour
Apr
19
9:15 AM09:15

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: Art, Architecture and Decorative Arts -- Historic Annapolis Walking Tour

Our day trip to Annapolis features a visit to the Mitchell Gallery at St. John's College beginning with an overview of the building's architecture followed by a tour of the retrospective show of 55 works by Robert Indiana.  Then, after a short walk, we will visit the nearby 1774 Hammond-Harwood House for a tour focused on the architecture and furniture crafted by John Shaw.  This will be followed by a special guided tour of the restored rooms and exhibits on the main floor of the Maryland State House.  The concluding event will be a visit to Government House, the Governor’s residence on State Circle, to view the furniture, furnishings and fine art in the public rooms.

Members-only; please see full description for details and RSVP via the Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Lisa Corrin, "The Topless Cellist and the Joan of Arc of the Avant-Garde: Charlotte Moorman’s Feast of Astonishments, 1960s-1970s"
Apr
17
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Lisa Corrin, "The Topless Cellist and the Joan of Arc of the Avant-Garde: Charlotte Moorman’s Feast of Astonishments, 1960s-1970s"

IN MEMORIAM:  BEATTY LEVI

The Topless Cellist and the Joan of Arc of the Avant-Garde: Charlotte Moorman’s Feast of Astonishments, 1960s-1970s
Lisa Corrin, Ellen Philips Katz director of the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art; and senior lecturer in art history, Northwestern University

Lisa Corrin will discuss the life and contributions of Charlotte Moorman (1933-1991)—performance artist, curator and “the Joan of Arc of the Avant-Garde.” Known through the indelible image of her playing the cello topless save for a pair of strapped-on miniature television sets, Corrin will offer a more complex but equally powerful portrait of a girl from Little Rock, Arkansas, who metamorphosed into a seminal and barrier-breaking artist and impresario in the 1960s and 1970s. Trained at Juilliard, Moorman’s dedication to a radically new way of looking at music and art took many forms, some extreme, from playing the cello while suspended by helium balloons over the Sydney Opera House to performing on an “ice cello” in the nude. A muse to Nam June Paik she was also an unequaled popularizer of experimental art finding imaginative ways to bring new art from around the globe to the broadest possible public by literally taking it into the streets of New York. The Block Museum of Art organized the first international traveling exhibition about Moorman, which was named by The New York Times art critic, Holland Cotter one of the top 10 best in 2016.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Eduardo Rios, "Violin Stories: Career Preview & Piano Recital"
Apr
10
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Eduardo Rios, "Violin Stories: Career Preview & Piano Recital"

Eduardo Rios, violinist

Eduardo Rios is an exceptional 22-year-old musician, born and raised in Peru, who is currently in his second year as an Arts Diploma candidate at The Colburn School of Music in Los Angeles. At age 19, Mr. Rios won first prize at the Sphinx Competition. He performs internationally as soloist, chamber musician, and orchestra concertmaster. He will be coming to Baltimore for the first time to speak to Art Seminar about his experiences and to present a violin and piano recital flavored with South American classical spice.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Joseph Cassar, "The Art and Life of Marc Chagall"
Apr
3
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Joseph Cassar, "The Art and Life of Marc Chagall"

The Art and Life of Marc Chagall
Joseph Cassar, professor of art, University of Maryland University College and the New York Times Knowledge Network

This presentation focuses on the humble beginnings of Marc Chagall within a Jewish family living in Lithuania near the city of Vitebsk, a picturesque city of churches and synagogues called at the time the "Russian Toledo". Chagall’s early drawings and paintings reveal this rich heritage which stayed with him throughout his artistic career. After a short cubist period from 1912-13, he founded the short-lived Vitebsk Art College (VAC) until departing for Paris in 1922. Faculty members at VAC included El Lissitsky, Kazimir Malevich and Chagall’s first art teacher, Yehuda Pen. The highlight of the presentation is a discussion of prestigious commissions Chagall received late in his career: the Paris Opera Ceiling in 1963 and several international stained glass windows which are considered the crown of his long and prolific artistic life.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Rebecca Brown, "Photography and India: Landscape, Monuments, People"
Mar
27
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Rebecca Brown, "Photography and India: Landscape, Monuments, People"

Photography and India: Landscape, Monuments, People
Rebecca Brown, associate professor in history of art and chair of Advanced Academic Program in Museum Studies at Johns Hopkins University, Editor-in-Chief of Art Journal

From serpentine roads through the Himalayas to the towering gates of South Indian temples, and from the courtly masquerade balls of India’s princes to massive ethnographic projects cataloging tribes, photography has had a major role in India’s history since the technology’s invention in 1839. We will explore how photography shaped the way we understand India’s art and architectural history look at major European and Indian photographic studios that developed and experimented with the medium, and end with the contemporary artists whose work is transforming how we think about photography.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Dominic Cossa, "Opera Stories: Reflections on a Career in Opera"
Mar
13
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Dominic Cossa, "Opera Stories: Reflections on a Career in Opera"

Opera Stories:  Reflections on a Career in Opera
Dominic Cossa, American lyric baritone and professor of voice, University of Maryland School of Music, College Park, Maryland

What is it like to be a professional opera singer?  Dominic Cossa will give us the inside perspective from his long and successful singing career including how it all started, what life on the road is really like, and a few stories about his famous and not-so-famous colleagues.  He will also sing some of his all-time favorite arias and songs including “Di Provenza” from La Traviata, “Pierrot’s Tanzlied” from Die Tote Stadt, and songs from Cole Porter’s Kiss Me Kate. 

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer V: The Image of God in Protestant Holland"
Mar
6
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer V: The Image of God in Protestant Holland"

The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer V: The Image of God in Protestant Holland
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland 

No other European country experienced the kind of dramatic transformation of its visual culture during the late Renaissance as Holland. In this lecture, we look at the ways in which artists such as Rembrandt and Vermeer found ways of representing “divinity” within a largely Protestant milieu by “domesticating” Biblical narratives, or infusing seemingly inconsequential scenes of daily life with profoundly spiritual content.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: "The Great Society" at Arena Stage, Washington D.C.
Feb
28
9:30 AM09:30

MEMBERS-ONLY TRIP: "The Great Society" at Arena Stage, Washington D.C.

  • Arena Stage (Fichandler Stage) (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Robert Schenkkan’s Tony Award-winning play All the Way set the stage for President Lyndon Baines Johnson’s sudden ascent to the White House. In its D.C. premiere, The Great Society brings the second half of Schenkkan’s epic story to its harrowing conclusion. As America is divided by civil rights protests and the anguish of the Vietnam War, LBJ struggles to maintain his relationship with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., keep his political opponents in check and complete a raft of impossibly ambitious social policy projects. Jack Willis reprises his “stunning performance” (Broadway World) in this political thrill ride that explores the America of our past to better understand the America of today.

Members-only; please see full description for details and RSVP via the Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer IV: The Sacred goes Underground"
Feb
27
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer IV: The Sacred goes Underground"

The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer IV: The Sacred goes Underground
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland

One of the most intriguing facets of the Reformation in Northern European art was the appearance of new pictorial genres – such as depictions of daily life. Yet, these ostensibly “secular” images were more often than not sophisticated allegories about the relationship between material and spiritual worlds and values.  In this lecture, we look at some of the most remarkable examples of such paintings – from the “Kitchen Scenes” of Pieter Aertsen, to the great allegories of the five senses by Jan Brueghel the Elder.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: "Tour of the new Arts of Asia installation at the Walters"
Feb
22
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: "Tour of the new Arts of Asia installation at the Walters"

Tour of the new Arts of Asia installation at the Walters
Amy Landau, Ph.D., Director of Curatorial Affairs, Curator of Islamic and South & Southeast Asian Art, Walters Art Museum

Find time for tranquility and reflection in Arts of Asia, the Walters’ new installation of one of the most exceptional collections of Asian art in North America. The dramatic display offers a rich exploration of artistic traditions from diverse cultures across India, Nepal, Tibet, China, Korea, Japan, Myanmar, Thailand, and Cambodia.

Members-only; please RSVP via the Reply Form.

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LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s III: The East Village, Graffiti & Identity Art"
Feb
21
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s III: The East Village, Graffiti & Identity Art"

  • The Central Presbyterian Church (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Pluralism & Art in the 1980s III: The East Village, Graffiti & Identity Art
Dr. Michael Salcman, art historian, poet and neurosurgeon

During the rise of the AIDS epidemic, American artists turned to photographic documentation of life with a focus on communities on the periphery of mainstream society.  In New York’s East Village and beyond, identity becomes the core focus of the art of the 1980s—race, homosexuality and feminism take center stage.  Many artists and activists adopted the Neo-Expressionist style in painting as a tool to express diverse identity politics, while others made use of graffiti and cartoon-based approaches.  Sculpture moved beyond the realm of “art object” to focus on social and political issues. Following this widespread engagement in political matters, art at the end of the decade dramatically shifts with the emergence of the Young British Artists (Hirst) and Pop-influenced art (Koons).

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer III: Pieter Bruegel and the Idea of Serious Joke"
Feb
13
1:00 PM13:00

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer III: Pieter Bruegel and the Idea of Serious Joke"

The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer III: Pieter Bruegel and the Idea of Serious Joke
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland 

Rather than a clear path towards a new mode of religious observance, the Reformation ushered in a period of great religious uncertainty in Europe. While many intellectuals –including Erasmus – maintained their allegiance to the Catholic church despite the general turn towards Protestantism in their countries, others shifted their religious affiliation in opportunistic fashion. This sense of instability was beautifully captured by artists like Pieter Bruegel the Elder in images full of “serious jokes” about human folly and our inability to make proper judgments about the world – or even ourselves.

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer II: Reformation before the Reformation: Hieronymus Bosch, ca. 1500"
Feb
6
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer II: Reformation before the Reformation: Hieronymus Bosch, ca. 1500"

The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer II: Reformation before the Reformation: Hieronymus Bosch, ca. 1500
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland 

More than five hundred years after his death, Hieronymus Bosch remains one of the most fascinating and perplexing artists of the Northern Renaissance. Though he died before the Reformation currents were truly set in motion, his pictorial world seems thoroughly informed by ideas associated with this religious movement. In this lecture, we look closely at some of his greatest masterpieces, such as The Garden of Earthly Delights, as deeply-coded meditations on spiritual blindness and the need for self-reform.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer I: Martin Luther and German Art in the Wake of the Reformation"
Jan
30
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer I: Martin Luther and German Art in the Wake of the Reformation"

The Impact of the Reformation on the Visual Arts of Europe - from Dürer to Vermeer I: Martin Luther and German Art in the Wake of the Reformation
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland

When Martin Luther called for a re-examination of the role of religious images in 1517, artists responded in a variety of ways. Some of them became champions of the Reformation and abandoned the representation of Holy figures. Others were far more ambivalent, adjusting their approach to religious narratives in subtle and often cryptic ways. This lecture looks at these diverse responses, focusing on Albrecht Dürer, Lucas Cranach, and Hans Holbein.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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 LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s II: The Pictures Generation: Photography & Feminism"
Jan
24
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Michael Salcman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s II: The Pictures Generation: Photography & Feminism"

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Pluralism & Art in the 1980s II: The Pictures Generation: Photography & Feminism
Dr. Michael Salcman, art historian, poet and neurosurgeon

The “Pictures Generation” burst onto the scene in an important 1977 exhibition that defined a new age that embraced photography and appropriation, and threatened the concept of “authorship”.  Influenced by Conceptualism and Pop, these artists used appropriation and montage to reveal the constructed nature of images.  Their works included photography and film and examined cultural stereotypes in popular imagery.  By appropriating well-known imagery, this art challenged the idea of individuality and authorship. They created savvy, critical notions of art while examining a generation of viewers saturated by mass media.    

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

Note: Pluralism & Art in the 1980s III: The East Village, Graffiti & Identity Art by Michael Salcman, originally scheduled for January 24, will be rescheduled for Wednesday February 21 due to the January 17 inclement weather cancellation.

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Jan
17
1:30 PM13:30

INCLEMENT WEATHER CANCELLATION: Michael Salcman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s II: The Pictures Generation..."

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CANCELLED DUE TO INCLEMENT WEATHER

Pluralism & Art in the 1980s II: The Pictures Generation: Photography & Feminism
Dr. Michael Salcman, art historian, poet and neurosurgeon

The “Pictures Generation” burst onto the scene in an important 1977 exhibition that defined a new age that embraced photography and appropriation, and threatened the concept of “authorship”.  Influenced by Conceptualism and Pop, these artists used appropriation and montage to reveal the constructed nature of images.  Their works included photography and film and examined cultural stereotypes in popular imagery.  By appropriating well-known imagery, this art challenged the idea of individuality and authorship. They created savvy, critical notions of art while examining a generation of viewers saturated by mass media.    

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Michael Salman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s I: The Return of Figurative Art: Neo-Expressionism"
Jan
9
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Michael Salman, "Pluralism & Art in the 1980s I: The Return of Figurative Art: Neo-Expressionism"

Pluralism & Art in the 1980s I: The Return of Figurative Art: Neo-Expressionism
Dr. Michael Salcman, art historian, poet and neurosurgeon

Art in the 1980s was a wild, mercantile river into which many artistic streams flowed.  This was the decade that ended the hegemony of abstract art and the dominance of America in the art avant-garde.  Once reviled, the pluralist 1980s now are viewed as the launch platform of Post-modernist art and contemporary art today. In a 3-part series, Michael Salcman will explore some of the main artistic streams during this decade. 

The 1980s was a time of meteoric growth both economically and artistically. Consumerism ruled and Conceptualism and Minimalism gave way to the return of painting and figurative art, or what became known as Neo-Expressionism. German, Italian, and somewhat later, American artists, combined vigorous Abstract-Expressionist brushwork with recognizable content.  Francis Picabia was influential and ancient myths, fascism, contemporary suburban life and portraits became the subject matter for many artists.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Sarah Greenough, "Photography Reinvented: The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection"
Dec
19
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Sarah Greenough, "Photography Reinvented: The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection"

Photography Reinvented: The Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker Collection
Sarah Greenough, Senior Curator and Head of the Department of Photographs, National Gallery of Art

Sarah Greenough, the founding curator of the department of photographs at the National Gallery of Art, will discuss Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker’s collection of contemporary photography. Acquired between 2007 and 2016, their collection includes groundbreaking pictures by many of the most celebrated photographers of our time, such as Thomas Demand, Andreas Gursky, Candida Hofer, Cindy Sherman, and Hiroshi Sugimoto, among others. Ms. Greenough will speak about the evolution of the Meyerhoff-Becker collection and note how these photographers - through their innovative experimentation and visionary conceptual scope - have changed the course of contemporary photography.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Evan Drachman, "Chopin’s Other Favorite Instrument: An Exploration of Chopin’s Music for the ‘Cello"
Dec
12
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Evan Drachman, "Chopin’s Other Favorite Instrument: An Exploration of Chopin’s Music for the ‘Cello"

Chopin’s Other Favorite Instrument: An Exploration of Chopin’s Music for the ‘Cello
Evan Drachman, cellist and Artistic Director for The Piatigorsky Foundation

Frederic Chopin was one of the greatest pianists of all time. In addition to performing, he composed a large body of works primarily for his own instrument. These works have stood the test of time and have been beloved by musicians and audiences since their conception.  Chopin’s music possesses a quality of both lyricism and technical virtuosity. The technical challenges in this music changed the scope of the piano’s capabilities. Interestingly, Chopin wrote for only one other instrument. He composed three works for ‘cello and piano as well as a trio for piano, violin and ‘cello. Drachman will discuss Chopin’s music for the cello as well as perform his great Sonata Op. 65 in G minor with pianist Richard Dowling. 

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP - Old and New Masters at the Barnes and the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts
Dec
7
8:00 AM08:00

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP - Old and New Masters at the Barnes and the Philadelphia Academy of Fine Arts

ASG members will begin this day trip with a guided tour or the Kiefer Rodin exhibit on view The Barnes Foundation with Thom Collins, Executive Director of the Barnes. The Barnes is presenting new pieces by renowned contemporary artist, Anselm Kiefer, created in response to masterworks of sculpture and drawings by Auguste Rodin. The mission of the 100 piece exhibition is to promote a conversation between new and old art. This tour is followed by lunch at The Union League of Philadelphia which has a distinguished collection of art and artifacts and is on the Register of Historic Places. Members will then embark on a self-guided tour of The Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts which has various exhibits on view including:
1) Chuck Close Photographs 
2) The Loaded Brush: The Oil Sketch and the Philadelphia School of Painting explores Thomas Eakins’ practice of making oil sketches
3) Graphic Women: rarely seen drawings, etchings, pastels, and watercolors by such professional Philadelphia women artists as Cecilia Beaux, Susan MacDowell Eakins and Mary Cassatt from 1880 to the early 20th century.
4) Beyond Boundaries: Feminine Forms - subversions and potentialities of feminine forms through works by women artists including Kara Walker, Lesley Dill, Betye Saar, Edna Andrade, Eleanor Heller, Nancy Spero, Joan Mitchell and Kay Walkingstick.

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