LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Shannon Egan, "Storytellers: Jeff Wall and Edward S. Curtis"
Dec
18
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Shannon Egan, "Storytellers: Jeff Wall and Edward S. Curtis"

Storytellers: Jeff Wall and Edward S. Curtis
Shannon Egan, director, Schmucker Art Gallery, Gettysburg College

Although contemporary artist Jeff Wall may be best known for his engagement with the history of painting, several of his photographs compare in subject and style to those by early twentieth-century photographer Edward S. Curtis. The issues of factuality and staging in what Wall calls his “near documentary” style are central both to Curtis’ reputation and to Wall’s process. Wall’s photography, in its similarity to Curtis’ work, simultaneously contends with current socio-political issues of class and race while emphatically recalling photographic precedents. Likewise, Curtis’ carefully composed photographs interpret the fraught realities of Native cultures in order to re-picture an American past. Our speaker will discuss the two photographers’ analogous interests as well as how “artistic” photography is defined in both the early and late twentieth century.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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PERFORMANCE: Evan Drachman & Doris Stevenson, "Explore Brahms’ Sonata in F Major"
Dec
11
1:30 PM13:30

PERFORMANCE: Evan Drachman & Doris Stevenson, "Explore Brahms’ Sonata in F Major"

Explore Brahms’ Sonata in F Major
Evan Drachman, cellist and artistic director for The Piatigorsky Foundation
Doris Stevenson, pianist and artist in residence at Williams College

Cellists are incredibly lucky with the repertoire they have as just about every major composer wrote at least one masterpiece for the cello. There are six Suites by Bach for the solo cello. Beethoven wrote five Sonatas and one “triple” concerto spanning his entire career. Brahms composed two Sonatas, the early one in E Minor, and the later in F Major, in addition to his double concerto for violin and cello. There are concerti by Haydn, Dvorak, Schumann, Elgar, Lalo, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations and Strauss’s Don Quixote. The only notable absence is a piece by Mozart. Oh well… without the struggle of trying to do justice to a Mozart concerto or sonata, cellists can say how magnificently they would have played a work by Mozart if only he had written one! Cellist Evan Drachman and pianist Doris Stevenson will explore the Sonata in F Major Op. 99 by Johannes Brahms through discussion and performance.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

 

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MEMBERS-ONLY OVERNIGHT TRIP: Steven Horsch and Brian Allen, "Puritan but not Puritanical: Art & Architecture in Hartford & New Haven"
Dec
5
to Dec 6

MEMBERS-ONLY OVERNIGHT TRIP: Steven Horsch and Brian Allen, "Puritan but not Puritanical: Art & Architecture in Hartford & New Haven"

Overnight trip to Hartford & New Haven
Puritan but not Puritanical: Art & Architecture in Hartford & New Haven

Art Seminar Group will visit Hartford & New Haven, Connecticut for two days of superb art and architecture. Two of America’s oldest towns, Hartford & New Haven were settled in 1636 and 1638, respectively, by English Puritans whose interests, in addition to work and faith, included learning, literature, music and the visual arts as well as good government and town planning. We are very fortunate to be traveling again with architectural historian Steven Horsch and art historian Brian Allen who know this area intimately and will guide us on our foray to New England. After a short flight to Bradley Airport, serving the Hartford area, we will devote our first day to Hartford, where we will visit the Wadsworth Atheneum, the oldest public museum in the country and Hartford’s crown jewel; known especially for its cutting edge exhibitions and fine collection of Hudson River School paintings. We will also visit the Atheneum’s largest art object, the former home of the legendary and innovative “Chick” Austin, the museum’s director from 1927 to 1944. Modeled on a grand 16th century villa near Venice, the house, 86 feet wide and only 18 feet deep, is decorated in spectacular and varied styles. In the 1930s it was a gathering place for leaders of the international art world.  If time permits, we will tour the State Capitol building, an 1879 wedding cake of a building known as the world’s “most beautiful ugly building”. Then we are off to New Haven to check-in at our hotel, The Study at Yale, followed by a group dinner. Thursday will be devoted to New Haven and include tours of the Yale Center for British Art, housed in an elegant, brutalist, 1977 building by Louis Kahn which completed a major restoration in 2016 and houses America’s finest collection of British art; the Yale University Art Gallery (three historic structures, each of architectural interest, one by Louis Kahn in modernist style, all open and renovated) with a new roof-top sculpture garden and a fine encyclopedic collection from ancient to the contemporary. Our day will conclude with a tour of the art and architecture on the Yale campus and a tour of the New Haven town green.   

Members only; trip description and reply form to be distributed following the release of the Fall newsletter.
 

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: John Waters: Indecent Exposure
Nov
28
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: John Waters: Indecent Exposure

John Waters: Indecent Exposure exhibition talk & tour with curator Kristen Hileman
Baltimore Museum of Art
Exhibit on view October 7, 2018 — January 6, 2019

The first retrospective of John Waters' visual arts career in his hometown of Baltimore presents more than 160 provocative photographs, sculptures, video and sound works. The exhibition concludes with a gallery devoted to ephemera, including objects from Waters’ home and studio that inspire him, and three peep-shows featuring footage from his rarely seen underground movies of the 1960s.

Waters’ renegade humor deployed through his works reveals the ways that mass media and celebrity embody cultural attitudes, moral codes, and shared tragedy. Exhibition highlights include a photographic installation in which Waters explores the absurdities of famous films and a suite of photographs and sculpture that propose humor as a way to humanize dark moments in history from the Kennedy assassination to 9/11. Waters also appropriates and manipulates images of less-than sacred, low-brow cultural references—Elizabeth Taylor’s hairstyles, Justin Bieber’s preening poses, his own self-portraits—and pictures of individuals brought into the limelight through his films, including his counterculture muse, Divine. Other themes explored include the artist’s childhood and identity, a satirical consideration of the contemporary art world, and the transgressive power of images.

This exhibition is generously supported by The Alvin and Fanny B. Thalheimer Exhibition Endowment Fund, Suzanne F. Cohen, Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker, Clair Zamoiski Segal, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Constance R. Caplan, The Charlesmead Foundation, Agnes Gund, Martha and Tad Glenn, Amy and Marc Meadows, The Pearlstone Family Fund, Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, and Sherry and Stuart Christhilf.

 

ASG MEMBERS: to register for this event, please email Lisa Dillin, ASG Manager office@artseminargroup.org Due to the recent addition of this program, there is no Reply Form for this program.

 

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(CANCELLED) LECTURE: Michael Ambrose, "The Design DNA of the Modern Museum"
Nov
27
1:30 PM13:30

(CANCELLED) LECTURE: Michael Ambrose, "The Design DNA of the Modern Museum"

IMPORTANT NOTICE: TODAY’S LECTURE (TUESDAY NOVEMBER 27TH) HAS BEEN CANCELLED.

The Design DNA of the Modern Museum
Michael Ambrose, AIA associate clinical professor and associate director, School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, University of Maryland, College Park

Michael Ambrose returns to ASG to discuss the historical trajectory of museum design and select contemporary examples within the field of museum design. From Shinkel’s Altes Museum in the 1820’s to the contemporary Guggenheims and beyond, architects explore the avant-garde of spatial, technical and aesthetic design thinking in pursuit of the evolution of the museum typology. Creativity and curiosity come together in the historical morphology of architectural form and thought through visual thinking and visual making in the design of the contemporary museum.  The indulgence of “what if…” and “what could be…” are as fundamental as the historical imperatives of museums, collections, and exhibitions. Architectural conceptualization and problematization in the design of the modern museum trace their roots to a common set of design principles that are shared and evolve with each subsequent museum design. From Zaha Hadid’s Dongdaemun Design Plaza in Seoul, Korea, to the new Bildmuseet in Umeå, northern Sweden by Henning Larsen Architects, today’s museum architecture continues to look backward and forward simultaneously to challenge and delight, frustrate and reward patrons and publics the world over. This talk will explore historical models and burgeoning trends while introducing the works of a select group of architects and contemporary museum designs to illustrate these concepts.

 $15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: "Theater Trip to New York - The Ferryman"
Nov
14
8:00 AM08:00

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: "Theater Trip to New York - The Ferryman"

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Theater Trip to New York - The Ferryman

Art Seminar Group is pleased to offer a day trip to see The Ferryman on Broadway on November 14th. Direct from a stunningly successful run in London, acclaimed by both critics and audiences, this is a play and production not to be missed. The Ferryman is a “rich, serious, deeply involving play about the shadows of the past and the power of silent love” (Ben Brantley, NYT).

Following unanimous, five-star critical acclaim and a thrice-extended, year-long run in London, Jez Butterworth’s The Ferryman, directed by Sam Mendes, finally debuts on Broadway this October. This “fiercely gripping play” (Ben Brantley, NYT) is directed by Academy® and Tony Award® winner Sam Mendes and has won three Olivier Awards, including Best New Play and Best Director; three Evening Standard Theatre Awards, including Best Play and Best Director; three WhatsOnStage Awards, including Best New Play and Best Director; and was named the Best New Play at the Critics’ Circle Theatre Awards. The stars of the London production (Paddy Considine, Laura Donnelly, Genevieve O’Reilly) will reprise their roles in New York, as will the key members (Director Sam Mendes, Lighting Designer Peter Mumford, Sound & Music Director Nick Powell) of the creative team.

Setting the scene: Northern Ireland, 1981. The Carney farmhouse is a hive of activity with preparations for the annual harvest. A day of hard work on the land and a traditional night of feasting and celebrations lie ahead. But this year they will be interrupted by a visitor. More information on this theatrical production here:  www.theferrymanbroadway.com

 Members-only; please see full description for details and RSVP via the Reply Form.
 

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LECTURE: Diane Coburn Bruning, "The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 4 of 4) Two Dance Interpretations"
Nov
13
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Diane Coburn Bruning, "The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 4 of 4) Two Dance Interpretations"

The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 4 of 4)
Diane Coburn Bruning, choreographer and artistic director, Chamber Dance Project

Two Dance Interpretations of Don Quixote: Don Quixote is a ballet in four acts and eight scenes, based on episodes taken from the famous novel Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes. The most enduring version was choreographed by Marius Petipa with the music of Ludwig Minkus and premiered by the Ballet of the Imperial Bolshoi Theatre of Moscow, Russia on December 26, 1869. Petipa then expanded the ballet into five acts using the same designs for the St. Petersburg Imperial Ballet which premiered on November 21, 1871. The leading characters have some of the most challenging roles in classical ballet and have been performed by many of the greatest dancers in history. In 1965 George Balanchine, inspired by his muse Suzanne Farrell, created his own version and played Don Quixote to her Kitri. Diane Coburn Bruning will discuss the original Don Quixote production and the structural elements of classical ballet employed and then touch upon the more recent Balanchine version.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Frances Klapthor, "Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography"
Nov
7
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Frances Klapthor, "Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography"

Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography
Frances Klapthor, associate curator for Asian art at The Baltimore Museum of Art

Curator Frances Klapthor will lecture on Time Frames: Contemporary East Asian Photography in the Meyerhoff Auditorium before leading ASG members on a tour of the exhibition in the gallery. Time Frames brings together 39 artworks by 33 artists born between 1929 and 1987 in four countries: Vietnam, China, Korea and Japan. Encompassing both hyperbolic and poetic images, the artists explore time in many ways: a time of day, a reflection about the world or shared cultural history, a past remembered or invented, an experience being lived or re-lived. A few address suspended time as periods of waiting or sleep. Some are real-time images. Others were created as a result of the length of time required for an artist to become immersed in the world of the photograph, to manipulate the subject or to capture the image. This exhibit will be on view at the BMA from November 4, 2018 through March 24, 2019. 

Members-only; Pre-registration required: please RSVP via the Reply Form.
 

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LECTURE: John Marciari, "An Impetuous Genius: Drawings by Jacopo Tintoretto"
Oct
30
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: John Marciari, "An Impetuous Genius: Drawings by Jacopo Tintoretto"

An Impetuous Genius: Drawings by Jacopo Tintoretto 
John Marciari, Charles W. Engelhard curator and head of the department of drawings and prints, The Morgan Library & Museum, New York

Although Tintoretto's paintings are immediately recognizable to most museum-goers and visitors to Venice, his drawings are unfamiliar even to many scholars of the Italian Renaissance. In conjunction with the 500th anniversary of Tintoretto’s birth, John Marciari has organized the first exhibition ever to provide a comprehensive look at Tintoretto’s drawings. Drawings in Tintoretto’s Venice presents a new overview of Tintoretto’s work as a draftsman and will be on view at the Morgan Library & Museum from October 2018 to January 2019, moving to the National Gallery of Art from March to May 2019, Drawings in Tintoretto’s Venice presents a new overview of Tintoretto’s work as a draftsman. The lecture will introduce the principal themes of the exhibition, with a look at Tintoretto’s sources, the evolution of his drawing style, his use of drawings as part of his painting practice, as well as for the purpose of training a large workshop of assistants. Marciari will also reflect on the problems of studying Tintoretto as a draftsman and on planning an exhibition with loans from collections across the US and Europe.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: Sparking Museum Joy: Day Trip to Pittsburgh for the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018
Oct
18
8:00 AM08:00

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: Sparking Museum Joy: Day Trip to Pittsburgh for the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018

Sparking Museum Joy: Day Trip to Pittsburgh for the Carnegie International, 57th Edition, 2018                 
Private tour with Ingrid Schaffner, curator of the International

In 1896, just a year after the first Venice Biennale, Andrew Carnegie directed his curators at the Carnegie Museum of Art to find “the Old Masters of tomorrow,” inaugurating the Carnegie International. The exhibition was intended to inspire local audiences and artists, and to position Pittsburgh as a center of not only industry but of modern culture. Now held every five years, the curated International is one of the leading exhibitions of contemporary art. The 57th iteration of the exhibition is organized by Ingrid Schaffner, a curatorial innovator known for her intensely researched and widely accessible exhibitions. Presenting work by 32 artists and artist collectives from around the world, the exhibition invites visitors to explore what it means to be “international” at this moment in time, through exhibitions within the museum and also offsite. The pleasure of being with art inspired the composition of this International – with a goal of “sparking museum joy” within visitors.

Art Seminar Group members will have a private guided tour of the exhibition with Ingrid Schaffner. 

Members-only; trip description and reply form will be distributed following the release of the Fall newsletter.

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 2 of 4) Don Quixote in the Visual Arts"
Oct
17
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 2 of 4) Don Quixote in the Visual Arts"

The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 2 of 4)
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland 


Don Quixote in the Visual Arts: Though Cervantes’ novel did not seem to have a direct impact on the visual culture of Spain, its resonance for later artists is undeniable – from Honoré Daumier to Dali and Picasso. Yet, as we shall see in this exploration of visual reflections upon this novel, the themes it addresses had a great currency among artists of Cervantes’s age, including, most famously, Diego Velázquez.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 1 of 4) The Moment of Don Quixote"
Oct
10
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Aneta Georgievska-Shine, "The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 1 of 4) The Moment of Don Quixote"

The Ingenious Knight of La Mancha and his Cultural Legacy: Four Centuries of Creativity Inspired by Don Quixote: (lecture 1 of 4)
Aneta Georgievska-Shine, professor of art history, University of Maryland 

Don Quixote, the main protagonist of the eponymous novel by Miguel de Cervantes, is one of the most famous characters in the history of Western literature. A would-be knight errant enamored of chivalric romances, he ventures into the world in a quest for adventure only to become the butt of countless jokes on account of his delusions of grandeur. In his search for lost ideals, reality and fiction are interchangeable and indistinguishable, as epitomized by his fight with windmills and his infatuation with a common peasant girl whom he perceives as the noblest of ladies.

At the core of this satirical, tragi-comic fiction, is a deeply philosophical question: how well can we know the world or anything within it for that matter? Instead of an answer, Cervantes offers only a series of narrative situations, each one more preposterous than the other, as if to suggest that any hope of answering that question is an absurdist dream. This series of four lectures explores some of the most important aspects of the cultural legacy of this narrative - often called the first modern novel - which has inspired countless works by artists, writers, and musicians since its original publication more than four hundred years ago.

The Moment of Don Quixote: What was it that led to the creation of Don Quixote in the first place? Why was it written in Spain, around 1600? What does this novel tell us about the literary milieu of Cervantes? What do its themes and their treatment tell us about some of the cultural anxieties of his era? These are some of the questions Georgievska-Shine will be addressing in the first lecture of the series.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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LECTURE: Joseph Cassar, "Henri Matisse: His Life & Travels"
Oct
2
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Joseph Cassar, "Henri Matisse: His Life & Travels"

Henri Matisse: His Life & Travels
Joseph Cassar, professor of art, University of Maryland University College and the New York Times Knowledge Network

Painter, collage artist, and colorist Henri Matisse was heavily influenced by the art of other cultures. Matisse immersed himself in the study of old masters and his contemporaries early on, collecting many works by those he admired. But his studies did not end there; he expanded his understanding of art and design through visits to exhibitions of international art and through global travel. After seeing an exhibition of work by Delacroix based on the artist’s time in Africa, Matisse traveled to North Africa to see this source for himself. Eventually, he saw several exhibitions of Islamic and Asian art, traveled to Spain to study Moorish Art, purchased textiles in Tangier, and spent time in Tahiti. As a consequence, he incorporated some of the decorative and stylistic qualities of these Non-Western influences into his own style. His contemporaries and close companions, Gauguin and Picasso, also sampled Non-Western art and design motifs. During the early part of the 20th century in Paris, the artistic elite readily rejected academic tradition. Non-Western art, particularly African art, became a source of inspiration for artists searching for new systems of representation eventually leading to the practice of abstraction in Western art.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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PERFORMANCE: Frederick Hodges, "Fascinating Rhythm: The Music Of George Gershwin"
Sep
25
1:30 PM13:30

PERFORMANCE: Frederick Hodges, "Fascinating Rhythm: The Music Of George Gershwin"

Fascinating Rhythm: The Music Of George Gershwin
Frederick Hodges, PhD, concert pianist

Renowned concert pianist Frederick Hodges brings the magic, romance, and toe-tapping energy of the timeless music of George Gershwin to ASG. Throughout his illustrious career, from the rhythmic ragtime era until the sophisticated 1930s, Gershwin captured the spirit of American music. His name evokes images and sounds of the Jazz Age, The Roaring Twenties, glittering Hollywood musicals, a wealth of Broadway musicals, and the beloved concert works that sprung from his creative imagination. The concert will feature favorite Gershwin melodies such as I Got Rhythm, The Man I Love, Embraceable You, Let’s Call the Whole Thing Off, Summertime, and Somebody Loves Me, played in virtuosic style by Frederick Hodges who is critically acclaimed as the definitive interpreter of the music of George Gershwin. What a perfect way to spend an afternoon — Who could ask for anything more?

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Private Tour of Meyerhoff and Becker Collection
Aug
7
10:00 AM10:00

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Private Tour of Meyerhoff and Becker Collection

Private Tour of Meyerhoff and Becker Collection
With Bob Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker
10 am tour

Art Seminar Group invites you to the residence and galleries of Robert E. Meyerhoff for a private tour of Bob Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker’s remarkable collection of large-scale contemporary photography by such artists as Andreas Gursky, Candida Höfer, Thomas Struth, Thomas Demand, Jeff Wall and Cindy Sherman. We will also briefly see one of the most renowned collections of Post War art in the world, featuring works by Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg and Frank Stella, among others. Both collections are promised to the National Gallery of Art which featured the photography collection at the reopening of the East Wing in September 2016.

Space will be limited to 20 members. Pre-registered members only. Driving directions will be provided to registered members. For questions, contact office@artseminargroup.org

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MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man" at the Renwick Gallery and “DAVE” at Arena Stage
Aug
2
9:00 AM09:00

MEMBERS-ONLY DAY TRIP: “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man" at the Renwick Gallery and “DAVE” at Arena Stage

Participating members will enjoy viewing “No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man" at the Renwick Gallery followed by the musical production “DAVE” at Arena Stage.

 

"No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man" at the Renwick Gallery, Smithsonian American Art Museum


Each year in Nevada’s Black Rock Desert, a city of more than 75,000 people rises out of the dust for a single week. During that time, enormous experimental art installations are erected and many are ritually burned to the ground. The thriving temporary metropolis known as Burning Man is a hotbed of artistic ingenuity, driving innovation through its principles of radical self-expression, decommodification, communal participation, and reverence for the handmade. Both a cultural movement and an annual event, Burning Man remains one of the most influential phenomenona in contemporary American art and culture.

No Spectators: The Art of Burning Man brings the large-scale, participatory work from this desert gathering to the nation’s capital for the first time. Taking over the entire Renwick Gallery building and surrounding Golden Triangle neighborhood, it brings alive the maker culture and creative spirit of this cultural movement. Immersive room-sized installations, costumes, jewelry, and ephemera transport visitors to the gathering’s famed “Playa,” while selected photographs and archival materials from the Nevada Museum of Art's show City of Dust: The Evolution of Burning Man trace Burning Man’s growth and its bohemian roots.
 

World-Premiere musical “Dave” – Adapted from the Oscar-nominated film  

From a Tony and Pulitzer Prize award-winning creative team, Dave tells the story of high school teacher (and presidential lookalike) Dave Kovic, who is hired by the Secret Service as a stand-in for the Commander-in-Chief. When the President falls ill under less than “presidential” circumstances, Dave is thrust into the Oval Office to avoid a national scandal, and must find a way to gain the trust and love of the American people … and the First Lady. 

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MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Eyes on Baltimore Tour: Sondheim Finalist Exhibition & Private Collection of Doreen Bolger
Jul
25
1:30 PM13:30

MEMBERS-ONLY EVENT: Eyes on Baltimore Tour: Sondheim Finalist Exhibition & Private Collection of Doreen Bolger

Eyes on Baltimore Tour: Sondheim Finalist Exhibition & Private Collection of Doreen Bolger
Cecilia Wichmann, assistant curator of Contemporary Art, Baltimore Museum of Art and Doreen Bolger, former director of the Baltimore Museum of Art

ASG members are invited to join us for a two-part tour of the Sondheim Exhibition at the Baltimore Museum of Art and the private collection of Doreen Bolger, former head of the BMA who has become a beloved fixture within the Baltimore art community, well known for her passionate support of regional artists.

This event will begin with a guided tour of the Sondheim Finalists exhibition at the BMA led by Cecilia Wichmann, the Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art. The finalists for the 13th annual Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize are: multidisciplinary artist Erick Antonio Benitez, Laurel photographer Nakeya Brown, Baltimore sculptor Sutton Demlong, documentary photographer Nate Larson, Parkville painter Eunice Park and painter/fiber artist Stephen Towns, who is currently featured at the BMA in a solo exhibition entitled: Stephen Towns: Rumination and a Reckoning on view through September 2, 2018. Jurors for the prize include Lauren Cornell, Director of the Graduate Program at Bard College and Chief Curator of the Hessel Museum of Art in New York state, Margot Norton, Curator at the New Museum, NYC, and Kameelah Janan Rasheed, a Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary artist and writer. The prestigious prize awards a $25,000 fellowship to a visual artist living and working in the Baltimore metropolitan region. The Janet & Walter Sondheim Artscape Prize is named in honor of Janet and Walter Sondheim who were instrumental civic leaders with a passion for public education for over 50 years. The Finalists Exhibition will be on view June 20 through August 5, 2018 at the BMA.

Following the tour of the Sondheim exhibit, Doreen Bolger, retired Director of the BMA, will welcome members to her 1870 rowhouse nearby to view her collection of some one hundred contemporary works by artists who are primarily Baltimore-based or regional. Her tour will focus on the work of several artists who are current or former Sondheim Finalists such as Melissa Dickenson, Neal Feather, Shaun Flynn, Nate Larson, René Treviño, and Wickerham & Lomax. Works are displayed amidst 19th-century furniture and decoration more expected for a house on the National Historic Register. Please note: there are steps involved to enter the house and to ascend to the second floor. Spoiler alert: some work is adult in nature! Good news: refreshments will be provided.        

Limited to 50 participants (two groups of 25 participants)
Pre-registered members only                               

 

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LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard"
Jul
17
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard"

Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard
Paula Burleigh, senior teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

The work of New York–based artist Zoe Leonard (b. 1961) exemplifies a tradition of photographers who have challenged photography’s traditional identity as an objective document. Perhaps counterintuitively, Leonard has done so through often straight, unmanipulated photographs. Surveying her work from the 1980s to now, we will see how Leonard addresses questions that are central to the history of photography, from the complex role of place and the constructions of identity to the medium’s relationship with death and mourning. Most importantly, Leonard’s work reveals the strange power of pictures: capable of alternately absorbing and generating emotional investments, cultural biases, (mis)remembrances, and nostalgia in the mind of the viewer. While Leonard is most widely known as a photographer, she actually works across a wide range of media. Consequently, we will think about how the questions that drive her photography equally inform her practice in installation and sculpture. 

Note: The exhibition Zoe Leonard: Survey is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through June 10, 2018.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

This lecture was rescheduled from the original June 19 date
which was cancelled due to a power outage.

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FILM: Faces Places (2017) 89 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed
Jul
12
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Faces Places (2017) 89 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
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Faces Places (2017) 89 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair of Film & Moving Image, Stevenson University

Faces Places – Co-directed with the street artist JR, a captivating documentary that follows the journey of the two directors/artists/friends through the hidden corners and small villages of France, charming the locals and practicing their art along the way.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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FILM: Vagabond (1985) 105 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed
Jul
10
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Vagabond (1985) 105 minutes, with Christopher Llewellyn Reed

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
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Vagabond (1985) 105 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Christopher Llewellyn Reed, chair of Film & Moving Image, Stevenson University

Vagabond – A stunner that created waves upon its release, telling the story of a young homeless woman living rough in the southern French countryside who tries to survive winter by walking further and further, quicker and quicker…

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 

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FILM: The Gleaners and I (2000) 82 minutes, with Linda DeLibero
Jul
3
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: The Gleaners and I (2000) 82 minutes, with Linda DeLibero

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
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The Gleaners and I (2000) 82 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

The Gleaners and I – An uncommon profile of scavengers who collect what others throw out or leave behind.  A personal and philosophical inquiry into the practice of gathering what has been discarded or passed over.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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FILM: Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) 90 minutes, with Linda DeLibero
Jun
28
1:30 PM13:30

FILM: Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) 90 minutes, with Linda DeLibero

  • Knott Science Center Auditorium, Notre Dame of Maryland University (map)
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Cléo from 5 to 7 (1962) 90 minutes by Agnès Varda
Introduction and commentary by Linda DeLibero, director, Film & Media Studies, Johns Hopkins University

Cléo from 5 to 7 -  Captures Paris in the 60’s with a real-time portrait of a pop singer set adrift in the city as she awaits the results of a medical test that she fears will confirm a fatal condition.  A compelling portrait of a self-centered young woman who gains some wisdom when faced with her own mortality.  

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

 
SUMMER FILM SERIES

 The Desire to See:  Agnès Varda At 90
Celebrating the remarkable six-decade career of the legendary French New Wave filmmaker

As the leading female filmmaker of the French New Wave, Varda has created a body of work whose scope and significance equals that of any other major figure of the movement.  Early on she invented the term cinécriture (ciné-writing) to describe her work, meaning every aspect of a film she makes is chosen with a view to an intended effect, message or meaning. She has faithfully followed this approach in a diverse 60 year career in which she has alternated between fiction and documentary while pursuing a unique cinematic vision.  Always experimental, always personal, her films focus on themes of place and community, common people facing economic or social difficulties, the challenges faced by women and the meaning of memory.

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Laura Owens"
Jun
26
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Laura Owens"

Artists Working Now: Laura Owens
Paula Burleigh, senior teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

Laura Owens (b. 1970) was critical to the re–emergence of painting in the 21st century art world, and her work continues to challenge the core facets of the medium’s identity. For example, while we might typically think of paintings as autonomous objects, Owens has developed a practice in which paintings both implicate and respond to their sites of production and display. Looking at the development of her work since graduating from CalArts in 1994, we will see how she considers perceived conventions of taste through engaging with themes of kitsch, cuteness, craft, sincerity, and irony. Owens’ work also opens questions of how and whether the medium can and should expand in response to new technologies, one of the most pervasive questions for artists working today.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​(cancelled) Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard"
Jun
19
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​(cancelled) Paula Burleigh, "Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard"

Due to a power outage, this lecture has been rescheduled for Tuesday, July 17th at 1:30 pm
at the Suburban Club

 

Artists Working Now: Zoe Leonard
Paula Burleigh, senior teaching fellow, Whitney Museum of American Art

The work of New York–based artist Zoe Leonard (b. 1961) exemplifies a tradition of photographers who have challenged photography’s traditional identity as an objective document. Perhaps counterintuitively, Leonard has done so through often straight, unmanipulated photographs. Surveying her work from the 1980s to now, we will see how Leonard addresses questions that are central to the history of photography, from the complex role of place and the constructions of identity to the medium’s relationship with death and mourning. Most importantly, Leonard’s work reveals the strange power of pictures: capable of alternately absorbing and generating emotional investments, cultural biases, (mis)remembrances, and nostalgia in the mind of the viewer. While Leonard is most widely known as a photographer, she actually works across a wide range of media. Consequently, we will think about how the questions that drive her photography equally inform her practice in installation and sculpture. 

Note: The exhibition Zoe Leonard: Survey is on view at the Whitney Museum of American Art through June 10, 2018.

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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LECTURE: ​​​​​​​David Gariff, "The Art of Paul Cézanne: The Eye in Service to the Mind"
Jun
12
1:30 PM13:30

LECTURE: ​​​​​​​David Gariff, "The Art of Paul Cézanne: The Eye in Service to the Mind"

The Art of Paul Cézanne: The Eye in Service to the Mind
David Gariff, senior lecturer, National Gallery of Art

Paul Cézanne sought to systematize the randomness of impressionism and to find an analytical way of seeing the world. His paintings express a new vocabulary of art and a new interpretation of the nature of visual experience. Cézanne's working methods grew out of his intent to produce paintings that captured solid form rather than the fugitive effects of his influential French predecessors. His subject matter ranged widely to include portraits, self-portraits, landscapes, scenes of everyday activities such as card playing, and still lifes.

Cézanne's belief that "there are two things in the painter, the eye and the mind; each of them should aid the other" was taken to heart by the young Picasso. In 1943, Picasso declared that Paul Cézanne was “my one and only master.” Indeed, with the artistic achievement of Cézanne, modern art would chart a new and challenging course. This lecture is an exploration of Cézanne's revolutionary art and an introduction to the Cézanne Portraits exhibition at the National Gallery of Art (on view March 25-July 1, 2018).

$15 door fee for guests and subscribers

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